Mayor's Attempt to Rush Airport Appointment Thwarted | Jackson Free Press | Jackson, MS

Mayor's Attempt to Rush Airport Appointment Thwarted

The Jackson City Council tabled confirming the appointment of local media mogul Wyatt Emmerich to the Jackson Airport Board after denying a request by Mayor Frank Melton and other councilmen to hold the confirmation hearing immediately following the council's special session Monday. Emmerich, publisher of the Northside Sun and other papers in the state, was present at the special session and ready for the council's approval. By meeting's end, he was still waiting, as council members opposed to the process pushed through an order to delay his confirmation until June 2.

The opposition's primary complaint was the untraditional timing of the push to confirm Emmerich so quickly.

Last week, Melton met with four council members: Jeff Weill, Kenneth Stokes, Frank Blunston and Charles Tillman. At that meeting, which was not public, they set Emmerich's confirmation hearing for Monday, May 19, to immediately follow the initial public special session announcing his appointment. Stokes did not attend Monday's meeting.

According to Weill, the council members who attended the special session had consulted with legal experts before making the move, and City Attorney Sarah O'Reilly-Evans said Monday that the meeting was legal.

The opposing council members—President Leslie McLemore, Marshand Crisler and Margaret Barrett-Simon—all heavily criticized the process, saying that the move went against established council procedure set over past years.

Crisler, Barrett-Simon and McLemore, who all together represent a combined 35 years of council experience, all said that the move to expedite the process of a city board member's confirmation, without time for public review, was the first that they encountered in their experience as council members.

"We always set a confirmation a week in advance so that the public can be informed, and we can allow due process," McLemore said. "A move like this is unprecedented."

Crisler took his criticism one step further, clearly referencing Melton's tumultuous tenure in a statement made directly at Emmerich.

"I will say this, and the other side won't represent it this is way. We do things up here according to procedure. For some reason the past three years that hasn't been the case. ... It's a way to do things, but it's the wrong way. I represent the side of doing it right."

Melton has pushed for weeks to push Emmerich forward through the confirmation process, but has met some resistance, one such occurrence being McLemore's removal of an order that would have started the process from last week's meeting agenda. Melton criticized the move because he had submitted his request for a special session before that meeting's deadline. McLemore said he removed the order from that week's agenda because of the meeting's time constraints.

The mayor also accused opposing council members of unethically taking phone calls from current members of the airport board who have concerns about Emmerich's appointment.

McLemore, who admitted to speaking with some board members before the council meeting but would not identity who, said that there is nothing unethical about taking a phone call from a concerned citizen, regardless of their position.

In the past, Emmerich's paper—which targets majority-white portions of Jackson and Madison County suburbs—has run controversial statements on the topic of race.

For instance, Emmerich gave a $100 award for a July 22, 2004, column by Dan McCullen, for its "community" appeal. That column opposed renaming the airport after slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers: "Medgar Evers has no connection whatsoever with the airport and the suggestion by City Council and some of the media that his name be emblazoned on the airport is simply pouring acid into old wounds."

The same column stated that African Americans should be grateful for slavery: "Every black in this country ought to give thanks every day that their ancestors were brought to this country where they were ultimately given every opportunity that everyone else has."

At the time, the Jackson Free Press criticized that award-winning column for its racist remarks. Later, Emmerich said in a comment on the Jackson Free Press Web site that it was a mistake to give the column an award.

Previous Comments

ID
129976
Comment

I can't stand him and don't want him connected to anything that matters to me.

Author
Walt
Date
2008-05-19T15:50:24-06:00
ID
129985
Comment

From Wyatt Emmerich-- Donna, you may recall that I responded to this a few years ago when it happened. For a brief time, in order to encourage letters to the editor and guest columns on local issues, we gave a cash "award" or whatever you want to call it, when readers sent in letters or guest columns on local issues. It was just to encourage submissions, not to endorse a viewpoint. This reader was the only person to write a letter to the editor that month so he got the "award." Quite frankly, I'm not sure I even read it for I was out of town. When Donna jumped my bones about this, I realized that people would interpret this as an endorsement of every column and letter. So we quit doing the cash award thing. As I said back then, I apologize for any misinterpretation. I did not write the letter and don't agree with its perspective. We were just trying to encourage people to write. Obviously it was a mistake and I learned from it.

Author
Wyatt Emmerich
Date
2008-05-19T16:53:17-06:00
ID
129986
Comment

Wyatt, did you print that apology/clarification in your paper after the column ran? I don't recall.

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2008-05-19T16:56:36-06:00
ID
129988
Comment

You know, Wyatt, you might want to rephrase one of your sentences; I don't think you're using "jumped my bones" in the correct way. 8-]

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2008-05-19T19:13:49-06:00
ID
129993
Comment

I guess I'm not up on the urban slang. I meant you "jumped my bones" as in you "jumped on me." Like, "He jumped on me for making a mistake." So sad that I am getting old. As I said, the Sun was trying to encourage local contributions on local issues so we had this idea that we would pay a $100 for letters to the editor on local issues. His was the only one that month on a local topic, so he got the $100. It wasn't meant to be an endorsement of the article's views, but rather to encourage local contributions. It didn't really work so we quit doing it. We run thousands of articles and some times mistakes are made. I nominated the first African American member of the Rotary Club of North Jackson. A racist typically doesn't do stuff like that. I could list a few other non-racist things I've done over the years, but you get my point. As a newspaper publisher, I believe in freedom of the press. My newspapers print many divergent views from all types of perspectives. Just because we print them doesn't mean we agree with their content. I am a pilot and I have kept my plane at Hawkins for a decade. Folks there really want me to serve on this board so they'll have some representation. Having lived in Jackson 18 years, I feel a sense of public duty to serve, since I have been asked. This position is not paid and requires a lot of time. Once I have offered to serve I have done my duty. At that point, it's up to the city council members. If they don't want my free time and effort, I won't be upset. In any case, it's quite interesting to watch the process unfold.

Author
Wyatt Emmerich
Date
2008-05-19T20:35:17-06:00
ID
129994
Comment

For the record, that's not "urban slang." It's more like 80's slang :P Used in the suburbs as well.

Author
emilyb
Date
2008-05-19T20:38:29-06:00
ID
129995
Comment

I meant you "jumped my bones" as in you "jumped on me." Like, "He jumped on me for making a mistake." So sad that I am getting old. I know what you mean, Wyatt. I thought it was funny. And Em is right; it's not urban slang. I think I first heard it in the country in Neshoba County many years ago. And my good police commander friend from Brooklyn liked to say it, but I'll leave that one there. ;-) Otherwise, I don't have a position on whether you should be on the Airport Board. I can understand some people's concerns, however; you haven't killed yourself over the years to put out a diverse newspaper, or cover the entire community, and you didn't seem to be overly concerned about what your own readers thought about giving an award for a column saying that blacks ought to give thanks every day for slavery -- not concerned enough to apologize in your own paper for it, right? Thus, the concerns I'm hearing is that you may not be the best person to have a say when it comes to the rewarding of minority contracts and the like. You can play the victim if you want, but those concerns seem legitimate based on the content and scope of your paper. And Wyatt: that column sucked, racist sentiments aside. It was rambling and poorly written. It didn't deserve any kind of award. And I thought he did regular columns for you then. Finally, I think you know as well as I do that one doing something nice for a black person has nothing to do with whether or not they are "racist." (The old "one of my best friends" fallacy.) Racism is about policies and practices toward people of a race, and having the power to affect them. With due respect, the fact that your newspaper has long been gerrymandered into "white" parts of the metro doesn't help your argument a whole lot. That doesn't mean I think you're "racist," but it does mean that I can understand the concerns of people on the Council and in the community about putting you in a position to make decisions about public contracts. And why in God's green acre is Melton trying to rush your appointment? Y'all are just going to raise suspicion by not doing a public-comment period. Come on. Finally, no one is attacking your "freedom of the press." You have that, and you made your decisions. The issue is what public decisions are made based on how you make those decisions. No one is arguing for censorship here, more like good taste and realizing the problem with insulting an entire race of people, as well as white people who don't go along with the kinds of stuff in that column, and who believe it makes Mississippi look like we haven't changed. Don't mix up the issues here.

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2008-05-19T21:05:50-06:00
ID
129999
Comment

It's like old times. I'm back in the blogging saddle and no place better than the JFP web site. I publish six newspapers in the Mississippi Delta, where 70 percent of the population is African American. Those papers are very diverse by any definition of the word. As for the Sun, dozens of photos each week contain African Americans. We love local pictures and run them all--the skin color is of no more significance than the color of the subject eyes. Our newspapers reflect their communities. As northeast Jackson has become more integrated so has the Northside Sun. I welcome this. As for minority contracts, I have always believed in promoting diversity. Mississippi has more minority owned businessess than any other state. This is a great thing which we all need to support. As for the apology in my paper, I received not one call or letter from any reader about the column you found so controversial. If I had, I certainly would have run it. The first I learned of this issue was on your web site, quite a while later. Since your blog site is so popular I will apologize once more for the record. I APOLOGIZE! If you'd like to send a guest column into the Sun blasting me for something that happened several years ago--I will be happy to run it. However, be forewarned, we no longer pay cash for local letters to the editor.

Author
Wyatt Emmerich
Date
2008-05-19T22:19:15-06:00
ID
130001
Comment

Regarding the controversy over when to have the hearing on my appointment: I haven't a clue. I was told to show up and show up I did. Everybody was there so I was confused as to why we didn't just get on with the show. Apparently there was some issue about protocol. Something about a list that had to go out first. Beats me. I was ready to answer any questions and get the thumbs or up down and be done with it. Anyway, I've done my part: I was asked and I agreed to serve. If the council's majority doesn't think I'm the right person, then I will be happy to accept their decision.

Author
Wyatt Emmerich
Date
2008-05-19T22:29:19-06:00
ID
130003
Comment

Regarding the controversy over when to have the hearing on my appointment: I haven't a Fair enough. I know how things work with the city these days. Not well. As for the apology in my paper, I received not one call or letter from any reader about the column you found so controversial. Curious. Is that the only reason to apologize for something so offensive that you just figured out was offensive after the fact? And the phrasing of that sentence rather makes it sound like the thanks-for-slavery argument is not something normal people would find offensive, and there is no reason to apologize for giving a cash award for it unless someone writes a letter or calls about it. Frankly, that offends me. And I find it simply astounding that no editor reading that column said, "uh, should we be running this?" My staff--even the white ones--were blown away by something so disgusting being printed and rewarded. I realize that you've apologized here, but really why not in your own paper? Is there a concern that an apology would offend your readers? Lord, I hope not. I have no desire to send a letter to the Sun. That's your baby, not mine. I haven't picked it up in months or read it online. And for the record, back when I picked it up last, there weren't a lot of black faces in it. Glad to hear that's changed. The metro is about 60 percent African American, so hopefully that has some effect.

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2008-05-19T22:50:45-06:00
ID
130004
Comment

Interesting discussion going here. Ladd, you bring up some strong points, though Wyatt is winning on the courtesy card. However, I am curious, has the JFP ever run a print apology for something that no readers complained about?

Author
choctaw
Date
2008-05-20T00:38:39-06:00
ID
130005
Comment

Well, it would seem that courtesy is in the eye of the beholder. ;-) I think Wyatt lost on the "courtesy" front the second that column hit the paper, and it's great that he apologized here after a lot of discussion had ensued about it. has the JFP ever run a print apology for something that no readers complained about? Sure, we always run an apology when we figure out and confirm that we've made an error, even if no one points it out to us. I don't believe, for instance, that any reader pointed out that Adam recently (and inexplicably) changed the name of Jesse Jackson to Reggie Jackson in a story. (!) But that didn't mean we shouldn't apologize for the error. I can't say that we've been in the position that Wyatt was on this one, though. They ran and awarded a column, seemingly without reading its content, that was very offensive to African Americans in a way that's hard to top, as well as most intelligent Americans who don't buy the argument that slavery was a positive thing. They didn't seem to notice that it was offensive until we pointed it out here, and then apologized -- but only here, because no one over there complained. (Maybe not many people read it? That's the kindest excuse I can think of.) Were I to not read something that goes into my paper (fat chance, but it could happen), and something that offensive slipped through and I found out later, I like to think I would have the good graces to apologize to my own readers, not just the people who caught the mistake. It strikes me as a bit of an insult to Sun readers to assume they wouldn't be offended by such a statement that makes us sound like we're still living in the Old South. Not to be discourteous, mind you.

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2008-05-20T00:58:15-06:00
ID
130006
Comment

I bought a courtesy card at the Millsaps library once. Blooming thing set me back $100. If I'd won the Northside Sun contest, I guess it wouldn't have. Anyway... The column is now being topped by national politicians who are likely to sell books off the ensuing controversy and make a lot more than $100. Note that Pat Buchanan makes the same exact slavery argument in the linked article, for example, as well as pulling out the old Jim Giles canard about black-on-white violence and boasting that slavery "introduced [blacks] to Christian salvation." I haven't read the Sun piece in a long time, but if my recollection is correct, Buchanan's is about 20 times worse. Not that this excuses the original. And eugenics is also getting sexy again. William Saletan of Slate describes anyone who doesn't believe in racial intelligence hierarchies as a "liberal creationist," and he has caught minimal flak for it. Not, again, that this excuses the Northside Sun column. But there seems to be a national problem here where white nationalism is making a comeback in places one wouldn't really expect, with defenders you wouldn't really expect to see. Hillary Clinton's "hardworking whites" remark, for example, is now being embraced as great political wisdom--and superdelegates are actually being encouraged by many to reassess the election as if only white voters count. Of course Wyatt should apologize. I'd assumed he had already printed an apology in his paper, but if he hasn't, then goodness, he's years past due for it.

Author
Tom Head
Date
2008-05-20T01:48:38-06:00
ID
130008
Comment

Wyatt answer this. why is the northside sun so lilly white. Whenever i pick up one of your papers it just highlights the white parts of metro Jackson. Are you in Franks back pocket and will your paper endorse him for mayor in 09 and will you help fund his next election.

Author
NewJackson
Date
2008-05-20T07:02:51-06:00
ID
130016
Comment

Wyatt, I enjoy reading the Northside Sun and appreciate the coverage. Keep up the good work.

Author
QB
Date
2008-05-20T08:30:48-06:00
ID
130018
Comment

I used to read the Northside Sun too. Rarely did I enjoy it though. I still scan it from time to time. The column or editorial written a couple of years ago praising the South before the Civil War, Emancipation Proclamation and 13th Amendment was the last straw for me. All the editor could say about the plight of black folks was a one sentence comment at the end of the column that it was too bad how blacks were treated back then or something like that. For me, that column defined the heart, soul and mind of the publisher and editor, and told me in clear terms what the paper was all about. Like the editor and publisher of the Northside Sun, I know there is a audience for such one-sided nonsense in North Jackson and Madison County. Surely, the paper scored a slam dunk with certain kinds of people for that editorial or column, and lost me as a marginal reader likely forever. But I know I was never counted in the big picture of things anyway. I do see a few more black faces in the paper than before. I wonder what kind of Negores are they. Probably Larry Elders or Walter Williams kinds of blacks without the intelligence or sense to get paid at least for the pretense.

Author
Walt
Date
2008-05-20T08:54:00-06:00
ID
130019
Comment

The column or editorial written a couple of years ago praising the South before the Civil War, Emancipation Proclamation and 13th Amendment was the last straw for me I seem to remember that piece. Shudder. Right, Ray. I don't think you were the target market.

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2008-05-20T08:59:22-06:00
ID
130020
Comment

Yeah i read it once and they had a feature on the hinds delegation and city council members, they only showed the white members of the hinds legislature and the only two white members of city council, no blacks. The northside sun is a racist paper.

Author
NewJackson
Date
2008-05-20T09:08:48-06:00
ID
130023
Comment

The Sun is the only paper which reports on issues that I care about, like what is happening with Fortification Street: http://www.northsidesun.com/articles/2008/05/15/news/01.txt or Old Capitol Green http://www.northsidesun.com/articles/2008/05/15/news/13.txt. Calling it a "racist paper" is a bit much, but it's target audience is white. That is pretty clear. In New Orleans, there are many papers whose target audience is black. I am not sure if Jackson has that but I'm pretty sure it does.

Author
QB
Date
2008-05-20T09:35:54-06:00
ID
130028
Comment

Harry, there is the Jackson Advocate, which has been around since 1938 and does indeed target the Black Community. The N-Side Sun used to be newspaper-light, someplace to see the picture of your kids softball team and the like. I imagine the current problem is like everyone else, you have to publish offensive opinions to draw readers. "Creating Conflict and Debate", as the Clarion Ledger used to call it over a decade ago when asked why they'd given up reporting actual news.

Author
Ironghost
Date
2008-05-20T10:03:57-06:00
ID
130032
Comment

Wow, this is a real hoot. Wyatt and Donna, you guys should be on your own talk radio show. This is great dialogue. Like Wyatt said about the nomination process before the city council, I think it's interesting to watch THIS dialogue unfold.

Author
FriendsofJackson
Date
2008-05-20T10:20:38-06:00
ID
130043
Comment

I can recall back around 2000 to 2003 or so there was an African-American reporter at the Northside Sun named Kim. The paper also employed another reporter named Jenny (I'm 95% sure I'm right about that name) who was white. What often offended me (especially after I had met Kim and discovered she was African American) is that Jenny's picture was often posted above articles that she wrote, as was Jimmye's, their white editor, but I never once recall seeing Kim's picture in the paper. I could be wrong...but personally never saw it.

Author
thabian
Date
2008-05-20T12:29:02-06:00
ID
130085
Comment

I nominated the first African American member of the Rotary Club of North Jackson. A racist typically doesn't do stuff like that. <<<

Author
Queen601
Date
2008-05-21T10:43:54-06:00
ID
130087
Comment

No good deed goes unpunished.

Author
QB
Date
2008-05-21T12:05:25-06:00
ID
130088
Comment

May 13, 2008 Uneducated Black Boys “If I were mayor, I’d have their (young black male) asses hanging from every tree limb on the lawn at City Hall. I am 59 years old, and like the majority of older black citizens of Jackson and across this country, I hate young black males because they do not appreciate what has been done (the civil rights struggle) for them. All black people should exhibit dignity because God has truly been on our side.”—July 2006 letter from George Lambus. I will never forget the day that I read this one. Still makes me sick. And two years later I see it again? I am just a bit confused here. Can someone explain? Although, I would like to send my congratulations to Mr. Lambus on his recent achievements. Good Luck!!

Author
saint H
Date
2008-05-21T12:06:05-06:00
ID
130089
Comment

Author
NewJackson
Date
2008-05-21T12:25:37-06:00
ID
130092
Comment

Yes, that letter to the editor shocked our staff. Then-Assistant Editor Natalie Collier (who is black) wanted us to run it, and she responded to it in an editor's note. By the way, I'm looking at the actual newsprint page of the controversial column by Dan McCullen. It is headed, "Guest Column" over his photo. And underneath it, it says: "Publisher's Note: Dan is the winner of the latest Northside Sun column writing contest and we are mailing him a $100 check! The local angle and insightful commentary made this column stand out. Every five submissions, the Sun picks a $100 winner." The "Letters to the Editor" are elsewhere on the page under a "letters" header. I know Wyatt calls that column a "letter" now, but there was no indication then that it was a letter. EVery editor knows the difference between "letter" and "column." You never use those words interchangeably. For the record, I've rejected many offensive columns (from the left and the right) and those filled with false "facts." I've also refused to run incendiary letters, although some are worth running so that people can see that there are people out there wtih backward ideas. But I would certainly give an award to one of them!

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2008-05-21T13:11:35-06:00
ID
130093
Comment

You really should! Make a sspecila section for them. I think the world needs to see them in all their backwards glory!Call it the Lambus Award of the Week Winner

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2008-05-21T14:43:03-06:00
ID
130094
Comment

sspecila A what?

Author
golden eagle
Date
2008-05-21T14:48:09-06:00
ID
130095
Comment

meant "special"..typing too fast. my bad

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2008-05-21T15:06:05-06:00
ID
130142
Comment

Used to see Natalie around town. She was sooo sweet. Hope she is doing well.

Author
saint H
Date
2008-05-22T18:07:47-06:00
ID
130237
Comment

As for the Sun, dozens of photos each week contain African Americans. We love local pictures and run them all--the skin color is of no more significance than the color of the subject eyes. Our newspapers reflect their communities. As northeast Jackson has become more integrated so has the Northside Sun. I welcome this. Wyatt, are you talking about the newspaper here? I was in Newk's over the weekend and picked up Northside Sun magazine for the first time in months because I remember what you said here about diversity in the Sun. I was shocked at how few photos there were of African Americans, in a magazine literally filled with hundreds of photos. I know I counted fewer than 10 photos with black faces. I turned the pages down, but it's at the office, and I'm not there. Wyatt, can you explain how that happens in a metro that is 60 percent black, not to tmention the city itself? And I don't ask that facetiously; I have quite literally not understood how publications in areas such as ours that don't openly and loudly target only one race (such as the Advocate and Link here, and our "white" papers of old) end up overwhelmingly one race. I feel like I would have to work really hard and deliberately to be that racially exclusive. We do work at ensuring our diversity, but it still comes more naturally than leaving out much of our population. I'm not trying to harange you here; your comment above is what made me follow up on it by looking through your magazine. And, quite frankly, I was blinded by "white."

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2008-05-28T09:06:38-06:00
ID
130238
Comment

Oh, and one more point. If your publications are so white, intentionally or not, might that be the reason that none of your readers complained when you ran/awarded that offensive thanks-for-slavery column? With the message that such a white paper naturally sends in such a demographically diverse market, maybe it did not seem out of the ordinary to those particular mostly white readers? That is, white readers who prefer more diverse media would be more likely to notice and care, right? I don't know, Wyatt. It seems like the world is moving ahead without you, with due respect. It doesn't seem like it would cost you anything but a bit of effort to reflect the market you supposedly serve, no? And if it does cost you readers to be more diverse ... well, then that's a different problem altogether.

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2008-05-28T09:09:15-06:00
ID
130548
Comment

I think Wyatt explained his position fairly well,that Mr. McCullen' article was the only one written that week or month or whatever it was and that it probably wasn't even read, that it was a mistake. Gawd, talk about beating a dead horse. Still offended after 4 years? Come on Ms. Ladd. Wyatt is probably the most enlightened person I know. I have always bragged on him that he has never once, NOT ONCE that I can remember, heard him say one negative thing about anyone (you were in the conversation once and not even then.....although he mentioned that you probably did not like him). Wyatt is an informed, intelligent, positive, enlightened Mississipian and it saddens me to read this diatribe.

Author
ksanli
Date
2008-06-05T14:05:58-06:00
ID
130550
Comment

Ksanli, I've already said that I think he is pretty enlightened and likeable ... in person. Unfortunately, the paper doesn't reflect the Wyatt I've spoken to in real life. Come on, yourself. You're making an excuse for him giving an award to a "column" (as it was called in the paper than) that said that blacks should give thanks every day for slavery. It doesn't matter how many columns were in that month. And I believe he was a fairly regular columnist, and there were others in that very issue. That all smells mightily of an excuse. No matter. Wyatt even has said it was a mistake and apologized ... to JFP reader, if not his own.

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2008-06-05T14:13:43-06:00
ID
130552
Comment

Also, are you arguing with a straight face that this column he wrote just a couple weeks ago is "enlightened" or "intelligent" or "informed," for God's sake?

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2008-06-05T14:16:37-06:00
ID
130553
Comment

"The liberals see the country as fixed in concrete, as though nobody makes more or less. They see the poor as the poor and the rich as the rich, with nothing changing. This just isn’t how it works" .....liberal focus on the ills of society and try to help the disenfranchised, which is a noble cause. In doing so, they have to make concrete generalizations. "Think about people you know. Think about young people who have moved up in their careers. Think about all the young people from lower-income families who are now successful professionals. Think about how many once-wealthy families are working hard to pay their bills. Life doesn’t stay the same. Things change." ........I know a lot of young people that have moved up and done well. And I have known wealthy families that have lost it all, but not too many. "I subscribe to the concept of the safety net and we have a good one in this country. Any seriously ill person can walk into any emergency room in the country and get treatment, no questions asked. We have dozens of welfare programs. Half the adults in Mississippi don’t work. Anyone who is willing to show up on time, stay sober and work hard can get a good job in Mississippi. The truth of this is obvious to any observant Mississippian." .......agree on emergency part. Not sure about half the adults don't work. And, God helps those who help themselves. A man or woman should work and they can get a job SOMEWHERE. My parents didn't help me with one cent in college, I lived in poverty for years, worked in the summer and long hours during school. I was willing to work anywhere, the oilfield, KFC, Manpower, whatever. I did it all on my own and never looked to the govt. "We all have fresh water, air conditioning, cars, more food than we need, TV, radio, the Internet, cell phones, etc. Given this prosperity, how important is equality?" .....maybe "most all of us". Maybe not all. "By itself, I suppose equality is a good thing. We were all taught to share as children. Certainly, Christ taught us to love our neighbor as ourselves." This society will never be equal. There will always be someone that is more ambitious and willing to work long hours to better themselves. You can call that whatever you want to. Some of us don't want to work. Some of us cannot work. The poor should be helped, but not enabled. Too much enabling going on. And on top of that, I realize there are a lot of needy people that need help. This is where family, friends, church and neighbors need to step in. Even Jesus realized this truth and said that "the poor will always be among you" He realized that you cannot prevent poverty in this "fallen world"

Author
ksanli
Date
2008-06-05T15:17:07-06:00
ID
130561
Comment

Are you seriously trumpeting the inability of Emergency Rooms to turn away patients as a triumph of American solidarity? Emergency room medicine is the most expensive medicine available casting those who are so unlucky as to have to use one without insurance into an insurmountable debt. This is beside the fact that illness is most efficiently and affordably treated through prevention. It seems that those who achieve "success" tend to believe they did it solely through their own blood and sweat; independent of any cultural benefit. Why would you look at the most downtrodden of our community, those who face the most adversity, and tell them that it is their own fault they are not succeeding? You act like Liberals have a Robin Hood syndrome. This argument caricatures a dynamic view of societal relationships and cultural adversity. Liberals do not hold some manic fantasy of parading up to Beverly Hills with torches. Liberals merely take an honest look at themselves and society and conclude that opportunities for some are far more prevalent than others. Liberals recognize that each individuals success is in part due to the successes of communities (infrastructure education, ease of communication). Liberals believe that hard-working Americans have the right to health and financial security regardless of the whims of the market or disease. (Disease which is sometimes caused by the irresponsible actions of industry in poor communities mind you.)

Author
daniel johnson
Date
2008-06-05T18:30:38-06:00
ID
130562
Comment

Call me crazy, but I'd imagine what really sunk it for Wyatt was his statement that naming the airport after Medgar Evers is "pouring acid into old wounds" in a state that has the Eastland Federal Building, the Barnett Reservoir, Forrest County, Jefferson Davis County, and on and on and on, not to mention the white nationalist emblem we've got hanging from the state Capitol. It seems that offending people who don't like the Klan and segregation is fine, but for the love of God it's "acid into old wounds" if we offend any ancient white segregationists by naming a facility after somebody they murdered. Wyatt isn't a bad guy, I don't believe, and he'd probably do a fine job on the Airport Board--but I don't blame the City Council one bit for deciding that someone else would be a better choice.

Author
Tom Head
Date
2008-06-05T19:59:56-06:00
ID
130563
Comment

I'm just amazed that race has played a part in this whole process. As fellow pilots, Wyatt and I have had many great flights together in various airplanes. He is an accomplished pilot, he understands the challenges facing general aviation and would have been a tremendous voice of experience. I know in typical Wyatt fashion, he will just shrug his shoulders and go on. The next time I see him, he'll look at me with that smile of his and say "Unbelievable". Sorry folks, the race card you pulled out on this one aint flying.....Liberals want society to be so enlightened, but then you wonder when something like this happens. ..I guess only in Mississippi? And someone up there wrote about the black reporter (Kim Sloan) not having her picture in the paper......my wife who used to work with Kim e-mailed this discussion to her. And what do you think she said? "... "...Hope all is well! Glad to see I am still famous! That is hilarious. If she only knew that it was not like that. The northside sun is one of the only places that I have worked that in the workplace my race was non valid...... What a joke!"

Author
ksanli
Date
2008-06-05T23:10:15-06:00

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