end of the year albums | Jackson Free Press | Jackson, MS

end of the year albums

It's a good time for music. Though the first single from Jay-z's new album "Kingdom Come" is underwhelming at first listen, Hov's come back album is everything I wanted it to be.

Where "The Black Album" really did have a gothic, laying-to-rest feel to it, "Kingdom Come" is a non-stop celebration. When "Kingdom Come" (the song) started thumping at the club on Saturday night (all a-blast with a smart, haunting re-do of Rick James' "Superfreak" beat), I felt like I was at a damned revival. Seriously, that Yung Joc, Jibbs, blah blah Do Your Chain Hang Low school of rap isn't doing justice to hip-hop.

The thing about listening to a Jay-z album is when you hear it, you know that no one else could have made that record.

In a similar vein (and in a genre that I like way less), the new My Chemical Romance album is what emo really should be. The MySpace free publicity age has made it so any boy with a guitar and some friends can whine his way up the charts. But the new MCR album, "The Black Parade," reminds you that music is bigger than you are.

Only Green Day, with "American Idiot," has put out this great of a modern rock/punk record. And though "The Black Parade" is a concept album focused on death, it is suprisingly triumphant. On "Famous Last Words," the album's closer, singer Gerard Way sings, "I am not afraid to keep on living. I am not afraid to face this world alone," and you can feel it like a chant. The album has given you plenty to be sad about, plenty to lament, but at the end it gives you the refrain that will set you free: I am not afraid to keep on living.

The album's lead single "Welcome to the Black Parade" beats up from cadence to dance pop to punk then explodes in a timeless guitar riff that makes you feel like life really is infinite (even in, ahem, death).

Previous Comments

ID
108649
Comment

Seriously, that Yung Joc, Jibbs, blah blah Do Your Chain Hang Low school of rap isn't doing justice to hip-hop. y'know, me and a friend of mine were talking about the same thing when i was in memphis this past weekend and it all boiled down to, "ok, we get it, you have rims, grillz, and money, now say something that actually matters!" LoL of course, we're both 29, about to hit 30 so that may just be the age talking :p

Author
William Patrick Butler
Date
2006-12-05T02:46:21-06:00
ID
108650
Comment

I'm not against a good pop song -- I'll dance to Shoulder Lean or Walk it Out just like anybody, but I think emcees act like they're doing so much more, like they're representing the streets and showing politicians what's up. But do they ever tell us how to get from the streets, from having no money, to having a chain that hang low? Nope. Oh wait, I can push coke. I love rap. I really do. And I am okay with its dirtyness, its violence, because I know people are rapping about what they know, but I just wish some (good) rappers would go the extra mile, you know? Also, I think very few of those ATL rappers are doing actual good raps. They've got good hooks, but you listen to a Jay-z disc, and it is filled out. The verse is just as important as the hook.

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-05T13:10:06-06:00
ID
108651
Comment

Well in the immortal words of the Joker, Casey...Wait til they ger a load of me!!!!! LOL

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-05T13:21:06-06:00
ID
108652
Comment

AHHHH, this is refreshing....first off....JIGGA a topic of discussion here....and not by Kamikaze our rap master....WOW. Now there is a big difference in rappers who rap to enlighten and inform (Talib Kweli, Common, etc...) and rappers who rap to bring energy and lightness to the world (Lil Jon)....and then you have those who rap because they are able to and get paid quickly (DJ Unk - Walk it out). Then you have the Luda's (Grew up a Screw up) and the Jay-Z's (99 Problems) who can speak to you on a very common every day level but are also politically conscious enough to offer your mind a though or two. Thing is people have yet to learn that rap is an art and should not be held to any one regard. It is not wrong to make rap popular as Luda and Jigga does. Nor is it wrong to be heavy in lyrical content as Common, Talib (and our very own Kamikaze) does. We are so pronged to make things simple and easy. But rap is a complex thing. It has different elements and different personalities. You just have to figure out which one is most identifiable with your personality to enjoy and actually find a love for it. And if you can get to the point where you can accept all facets of rap...well hell, you're well on your way.

Author
Queen601
Date
2006-12-05T13:30:48-06:00
ID
108653
Comment

hehe. I KNOW. Why aren't guys like you the face of Southern Hip-Hop? Your rhymes are more complex, more varied, more street (which is supposedly what we're liking in the shoulder lean fellows, too) Also, I can't figure out why people love lil jon.

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-05T13:32:04-06:00
ID
108654
Comment

But do they ever tell us how to get from the streets, from having no money, to having a chain that hang low? Nope. Oh wait, I can push coke. LoL sounds like someone's been listening to the new Rick Ross album (which i really dig but didn't think i would before i listened to it)

Author
William Patrick Butler
Date
2006-12-05T13:32:32-06:00
ID
108655
Comment

nice nice Queen. I love Common and Talib, too. I wish there were some in-between rappers. You know, I know not everybody's going to listen to Common and Talib or Dead Prez or the Coup, but I wish the guys that made it up the charts had at least a little more something to them. I just feel like rap could really be the answer to so much awareness, so much change in the world, but what gets seen (and thereby dismissed by policy makers or others) is just that crunk or that hit. I think you're right -- there's room for all, but I wish there were more people who mixed it up. Jay-z mixes it so well, I think. And I think Kami does, too. All of his songs aren't concious (even though I know he works his ass off really doing something for the community, and he does rap about it, too). I don't want it for me. I want it for the world, for the people who aren't going to go looking. I want a hook that stays in your head but challenges you or shows you the way.

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-05T13:36:58-06:00
ID
108656
Comment

I think that the shoulder lean folk are getting popular because of there beats and tracks. I don't see street when I see them. Nor do I think they are reppin for the streets. As a matter of fact what do you mean by "Your rhymes are more complex, more varied, more street (which is supposedly what we're liking in the shoulder lean fellows, too)". This seems like you're making a point that i'm eager to touch on, however, I will allow you the opportunity to make it plain for me first, casey. Is that why non-blacks listen to rap....for the "down with the street music" movement?????????????

Author
Queen601
Date
2006-12-05T13:39:38-06:00
ID
108657
Comment

I just feel like rap could really be the answer to so much awareness, so much change in the world, but what gets seen (and thereby dismissed by policy makers or others) is just that crunk or that hit. I agree with you on that.... You know why that doesn't work. Because those who are able to guide and direct stop when they aren't making the dividends to feed there families. They are forced to offer dumbed down versions of songs and hooks. THey have to start talking about bustin heads to the white meat and about girls gettin down on the flo'. Because folk would rather dance than to braoden their minds. And I would very much love to have this for the world too. I hate that good solid rappers are plaqued with not being able to put out what they would like to put out and it would make a difference, but this society we live in has made it difficult to do that. It's like they have to either rap about the bullcrap or they have to stay broke and poor with their solid visions. UNFORTUNATE>

Author
Queen601
Date
2006-12-05T13:43:33-06:00
ID
108658
Comment

oh no, I mean, rappers in interviews are always saying they're street or they're going to take over the streets. Does that just mean they're going to have the top song on iTunes? Is that the new proverbial street? I mean, I don't even think rappers have to have struggled. I feel like hip-hop could really teach us so much (remember, I'm a journalist, primarily interested in articles and what I can learn about humanity, about culture from them, so when I listen to rap songs, I'm partially listening to see what I can learn so that I can talk to people who live these realities, to find out what they want different in their lives, what they want Americans to know about. In Hate it Or Love It, is 50 Cent telling me ain't nothing good in the hood so that we can all abandon the hood? I like to think not, and when I hear it, I want to figure out a way to make politicians know it (FEEL IT) so something can change). You're right on the beats. Shoulder Lean gets stuck in my head, and I totally downloaded it AND I Know You See It because hey, I like dancing in my living room with my girlfriend to those songs. I think non-blacks have started listening for that reason. You just can't dance to Nickleback. But maybe that ego and that down with the street does play into it. I'm not really sure. Rhymes more complex, more varied -- I meant I feel like Kamikaze has good verses. Popular hip-hop has become, for me, more about the hook than the verses. I want albums whose songs each possess their own life and personality. As for varied, I meant, he has different subjects. It's not all concious, not all party, not all ego, but there's a little taste of all of it.

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-05T13:49:42-06:00
ID
108659
Comment

It's like they have to either rap about the bullcrap or they have to stay broke and poor with their solid visions. UNFORTUNATE yeah, that's the vibe i get a whole lot too esp with the Black Eye Peas. their albums before Monkey Business were less "poppy" but didn't put them at the top of the billboard charts. which is a shame because early Black Eye Peas was smooth

Author
William Patrick Butler
Date
2006-12-05T13:51:32-06:00
ID
108660
Comment

from jay-z's moment of clarity (exactly what you're saying queen): The music business hate me Cause the industry ain't make me Hustlers and boosters embrace me And the music i be makin I dumb down for my audience And double my dollars They criticize me for it Yet they all yell "Holla" If skills sold Truth be told I'd probably be Lyricly Talib Kweli Truthfully I wanna rhyme like Common Sense (But i did five Mil) I ain't been rhymin like Common Sense When your sense got that much in common And you been hustlin since Your inception Fuck perception Go with what makes sense Since I know what i'm up against We as rappers must decide what's most important And i can't help the poor if i'm one of them So i got rich and gave back To me that's the win, win The next time you see the homie and his rims spin Just know my mind is workin just like them (The rims that is)

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-05T13:53:32-06:00
ID
108661
Comment

"hehe. I KNOW. Why aren't guys like you the face of Southern Hip-Hop? Your rhymes are more complex, more varied, more street (which is supposedly what we're liking in the shoulder lean fellows, too) Also, I can't figure out why people love lil jon. " You know casey Ive been asking myself that question too LOLOL!!!!!!! But really it amounts to supply and demand. This industry is a business first. A lesson that Banner and I learned first hand. We made an album(a classic by hiphop standards) and only hand full of people bought it. We got released from our label and left to fend for ourselves. In this game the only thing that matters are numbers... If you enjoy Kamikaze's music then you need to support it when it drops. Email a friend, go on myspace and encourage friends to buy it. Sing its praises. But mostly support with those dollars because ultimately that is what will motivate labels to pay more attention to it. If Common drops an album and it sells over half a million copies like Jay'Z's new album did...guess what? The labels will kiss Common's ass and rush out to sign more Common-like rappers to make that money. simple point. Problem is, most folks only talk a good game and complain about the climate of music but don't support with what counts...their dollars. Whether its a an album or a show casey when ya see its available go support it. If you're a fan then next time you see me having a show...Come out!!!!! and bring your friends. And have them bring friends. When my albums drop be there FIRST DAY to buy it. Support what you like and you can change the climate one person at a time. But till then...we must as Queen says...bust heads to the white meat. Cuz like it or not, thats what has me making the social impact I am today. My popularity from those "type" songs. I can reach kids here quicker than Common can. Unfortunate, I don't personally like it, but its true.

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-05T14:17:29-06:00
ID
108662
Comment

and where can i get grey skies? I've never heard it and Skipp Coon is always telling me it willl blow my mind at how amazing it is.

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-05T14:22:37-06:00
ID
108663
Comment

and folks have to understand. Lil Jon appeals because of the raw energy his music conveys. You may say Im crazy, but its almost spiritual or tribal in a way. His music speaks to the frustrated, stressed, angry, non-empowered youths who are fed up. Instead of going crazy, you can hear lil jon at a club and literally work off all that stress. Its amazing to see how much power his music has. Trust me, Ive worked with him and toured with him. He's a genius! most people dont know that. Hes a musician and a student of production. But he's judged by the crunk music. His songs are the raw emotions of black folks put into music.

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-05T14:23:16-06:00
ID
108664
Comment

now that's really interesting, K, (about Lil J): I haven't ever thought of it like that. The Creative Loafing (ATL alternative weekly) did a great feature about him a few years ago that I really loved. His voice has always turned me off, though. It sounds so invasive. But I can see what you're saying.

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-05T14:25:58-06:00
ID
108665
Comment

Amazon.com I hear there's a few vintage copies there for sale. or...since that wouldnt be getting me paid anyway... I can burn ya a copy. Itll blow ya mind cuz knowing us now...folks cant believe where we once were...And where hopefully we can go again in the future. And folks that were fans then have been none-to-pleased with our directions lately but......The heart is still there just the methods are different. Ironically we've reached more folks now than we ever would have had we stayed on that road. So I guess it works itself out in the end. Thats why SOMEONE has to do that DEFINITIVE KAMIKAZE interview casey LOL. Got a story to tell whew!

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-05T14:28:55-06:00
ID
108666
Comment

or google crooked lettaz and you'll be interested at what you will pull up. Could give ya some much needed backstory. You'll understand where we're at when ya know where we've been. and anybody reading...google crooked lettaz/grey skies

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-05T14:30:22-06:00
ID
108667
Comment

Personally, as an old ganster, I'm tiring on many of the young rappers. Where are the new creativite ideas and growth. Can any of them make a hit record without fleshing it up with a beautiful gyrating women? Wait until we come out with our first album! We're working on cuts like this for side one: 1. Shut Up and Fix Me a Sandmich, 2. I'll Be Home When I Get There, 3. I am Where I am, 4. Why Do I have to Have Just You, 5. Hate the Game, Not the Player, and 6. Stay out of My Bizness. Side two will comprise these hits: 1. Viagra, 2. Cialis, 3. Still Pimping, 4. ____ the police, 5. She Just Throwed it On Me, 6.Young rappers ain't got no fizz, and 7. Crackheads. Our name is Butthole Funk. Yeah, I know it's a nasty name, but we plan to be nasty and daring. The name will cause shock, awe and intirgue, and we will soon jump into viagra and cialis, etc.. I can already picture old and young women shaking their groove thangs and waiving their hands like they just don't care. We're purposefully shooting for the old and young people, and we plan to put a lot of those young uncreative whippersnapping rappers out of business. We've already signed with J-Records, the label that has Whitney Houston. We're hoping we can get Whitney to help us out on the crackhead cut. Out and onward. It should be coming out in about 6 months.

Author
Ray Carter
Date
2006-12-05T14:40:10-06:00
ID
108668
Comment

Grey Skies is surely something you should get cha hands on Casey. I highly recommend it. I think that rappers SHOULD NOT conform to the masses desire. I think that if they charge it to the game and maybe do something else to feed their families but still use their voice to bring about change....that's the breaking point. Kaze feels that if we go buy it and make enough noise, I guess, that once he gets out there he can have control enough to put out what he really wants to put out....sort of like Kanye. I feel that. But on the other hand, Kaze, someone has to break the mold. Someone is going to have to make noise by staying true to the vision and thus being successful in that way. Trying to get your foot in the door by doing the bullcrap raps and then hoping to change once you do, to me, is not a smart notion. BECAUSE once you get there, people will expect you to keep giving them what you gave them when they got you there. Case in point, Black EYe Peas. They are not going to accept you changing on them and then you'll be again back to where you were with Tommy Boy. Just my 2 cents. I think that the value of spreading peace and knowledge should outweigh that which money brings anyway....but to each it's own.

Author
Queen601
Date
2006-12-05T14:41:27-06:00
ID
108669
Comment

Well Queen....your voice only carries weight when there is a respect factor amongst those you are trying to reach. In this new age, there is a new breed of young people who have been influenced by many of the wrong things...unfortunately. Common or Kanye, who incidentally have messages that need to be heard, get little or no play in the hood because they are deemed "soft" by young folks who dont know any better. Terrible I know, but because of that, they dont respect them enough to listen to what they have to say. Somehow, someway, Folks like myself and Banner have touched a nerve and have garnered that respect. Though our means may not be good to some, fact is, it gets us in where a lot of artists can't. Because they are fans of and respect what we do, they listen. Kids here are starstruck by TV and radio and the fact that Banner and I do this for a living. we cater to their "rapper fantasies". I could easily "do something else" and adhere to a strict code of rapping about certain things. But trust me, the rapper that works at Chilli's while trying to be conscious will get no respect. To these kids, the fact that he has a job cancels his rap cred. Sad, but true. None of them want to buy a record from a rapper that works at the store on the corner. Even if I wanted to, that would be a tremendous step backwards. And I would lose my impact. You have to be palatable to the masses to get that edge...to REALLY make change. It's like becoming a part of the matrix. Look at the career of Outkast for instance. Perfect example. Analyze album one till now. NOW...they are able to make the music they want. But their first album..well...you know what that was..playa s--t!!! Black Eyed Peas...same thing...Once you've reached a mass audience they are more acceptable of experimentation and strong lyrical content.

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-05T16:33:20-06:00
ID
108670
Comment

"I think that the value of spreading peace and knowledge should outweigh that which money brings anyway....but to each it's own." - Queen Amen, Queen! Kaz, I also agree with Queen about doing your thing rather than selling out to "reach the masses." I hate to use the phrase "selling out", but in many ways it sounds appropriate. Interestingly, in the dance/techno/house scene, artists may have several personalities to go along with their musical interests/experiments. DJ X may produce happy hardcore while DJ Y produces mechanical, Detroit tech house... But, DJ X and DJ Y are actually the same person. It allows these producers to experiment and reach new audiences without necessarily damaging the different personaes by releasing something they don't normally expect from X or Y. Of course, I realize it's far more difficult with rap where the focus is on an MC and physical presence rather than a vinyl record/MP3 circulated via white labels. Still, it's been done by rappers recently and with some degree of success.

Author
kaust
Date
2006-12-05T16:54:31-06:00
ID
108671
Comment

queen - hit me up with your contact info ([email protected] jacksonfrepress .com). i got some story ideas i want to pitch to you

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-05T17:19:57-06:00
ID
108672
Comment

Funny you said that Knol...I was thinking of something JUST like that. That may just be an idea hmmmmmmmm.........

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-05T17:22:01-06:00
ID
108673
Comment

who? who? i dont know any rappers like that. Garth Brooks did that with Chris Gaines once, though.

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-05T17:22:41-06:00
ID
108674
Comment

j-town's got its own concious rappers, too, if people are more into that. 5th Child has got some great songs. listen

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-05T17:53:14-06:00
ID
108675
Comment

It does Casey...Saw 5th child perform before. Then there's Skip and a guy named Melatone...Phingaprint says there's more but I havent seen em. With the re-emergnce of Seven. thought more would come..Id hate to think those are the only ones. Casey you should hav come to the Rhymefest show last Friday. the Vibe was Great and Scrap and I are talking about doing more of that. If those damn Millsaps folks wasnt so scared to just walk down the damn street I KNOW they would enjoy it.

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-05T18:22:23-06:00
ID
108676
Comment

oh I wish I could. I'm all the way in Washington state, though. Far far away from Jackson. I do like Rhymefest, though. There has got to be a way to get Millsaps people going to those shows. Or for that matter, why arent hip hop shows on the jfp music list? I never see them really. If we can't get our own people to go to those shows, how're we going to show the rest of the country how good jackson hip-hop is? I dont know the answer, but I really do have faith if somebody's going to bridge that gap, it's going to be you, Kamikaze. You're probably the only local rapper any of those Millsaps kids know. We've got to get more rap shows on that campus and get more of those kids to the rap shows around the corner.

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-05T18:28:50-06:00
ID
108677
Comment

gonna have to add a 5th Child track to the next podcast

Author
William Patrick Butler
Date
2006-12-05T18:37:45-06:00
ID
108678
Comment

yep!

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-05T18:41:57-06:00
ID
108679
Comment

Casey, I'm digging 5th Child... Thanks for the heads up. Especially love the samples and vibe of the music -- reminds me of any given Ninja Tune artist (most of which are dirty, sampled and vintage sounding) -- especially London Funk Allstars. Will have to take a deeper listen to the lyrics tonight.

Author
kaust
Date
2006-12-05T18:55:41-06:00
ID
108680
Comment

I want to do some stories about house deejays, Knol, in the JFP. Who should we be spotlighting?

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-05T19:10:55-06:00
ID
108681
Comment

You know what I think is interesting? Nearly every hip hop DJ I've met (along with the majority of club djs spinning house) doesn't necessarily dig what the audience wants to hear. In my case, I love tech and electro house; unfortunately, the people I've played for want to hear booty music and crapp-tacular commercial house. Why lesbians and gays want to hear misogynist lyrics and songs about !#@[email protected]#$ blows my mind! Anyway, the tech/electro/tribal house I like is on the charts everywhere from LA to Chicago to NY to Ibiza. Same for hip hop DJs I've talked to... Most I've talked to like deep and/or Chicago house, instrumental and intelligent hip hop, acid jazz, etc. They play gangsta and crunk to reach the audience. So, I do hear you K about reaching the masses... But, there has to be a comfortable middle ground. For instance, when I play one of the local gay bars, I may play a Madonna track, but you better believe it's going to be a tribal mix full of deep bass, loud tribal drums, and layers of percussion. After all, they only want to hear Madonna and to be able to sing along. Of course, I suspect they'd still prefer to hear the radio mix and/or something akin to 2 Live Crew. Still, as it is, the music scene in Jackson suffers. I can't quite put my finger on it. It's not that there isn't talented musicans, producers, djs, etc... I can't help but think it's the ones in power (including radio stations) are simply putting out/pimping bad music.... And by bad music, I mean BAD music! And, after watching the Billboard awards, I can't help but think it's becoming a nationwide epidemic. Nickleback winning over RHCP? Come on! Whiney rock wins over funk? Jeez! Music is fashion these days... You have your classics and soon-to-be classics in a few places and the rest of the creative mall is full of trendy crap that falls apart after a few wears. Hope all that made a little sense. I'm rushed.

Author
kaust
Date
2006-12-05T19:11:25-06:00
ID
108682
Comment

LOL! House DJs in Jackson? Casey, you jest. I honestly don't know of many house djs that stick to house. I don't know that many people still like house in Jacktown though it's my preferred format of music in a club followed closely by acid jazz and hip hop. Of course, finding those intelligently mixed is another story. You won't find good house in the gay bars at the moment (unless I'm mixing/remixing). ;-) It's a sad fact that actually pains me. House is the music of the gay bar and urban black communities of the early 80s. House was ghetto before hip hop and by ghetto I mean it was playing in gay and black American ghettos in places like NY, Detroit and Chicago. Unfortunately, it seems both communities in Jackson don't know the history of the music or don't care. They don't know house began in a gay bar in Chicago (the Warehouse) and was primarily produced by young, black men that wanted to play their music wherever they could. A gay bar worked and the scene quickly became far more mixed as a result of the unifying beat of house. It was a unifying music and still is. Maybe that's why it doesn't work in Jackson or Mississippi... Can't have all these classes, races, and orientations mixing... That'd be a bad thing and might actually spur progression and understanding. ;-) There's a few house djs that play the "rave parties" and I'm sure quite a few of the hip hop djs have crates of house but I don't frequent either scene for different reasons (booty music and gangsta in the hip hop and breaks and D'n'B in the "rave") we've discussed in several other threads. I don't particularly like those genres though I'm open and have several artists in those genres I particularly enjoy; I simply prefer Chicago, tribal, tech, and electro house. I wish more did. Hell, I wish more were open to new music -- especially songs that might not have lyrics or a rhythm that doesn't encourage unwanted pregnancy. ;-)

Author
kaust
Date
2006-12-05T19:42:23-06:00
ID
108683
Comment

Have to share this with you Casey since we're on the topic of house at the moment... True story: the other night I was mixing at Jack & Jill's and a 30-something actually requested I play "Mr Vain" (if you don't know the song, don't bother) and specifically requested that I stopped playing techno. I stared blankly. After a long silence, I said, "Techno?" He said, "Yes. Techno." I proceeded to explain that the song(Discoteka by Starkillers) that was playing (and the previous 6 tracks) were considered electro house andtribal house; and that techno was primarily a German export with little-to-no words that focused on minimalism and mechanics similar to Detroit house. Further, I explained to him that Culture Beat's "Mr. Vain" was over 10 years old and still not considered a classic while the songs I was playing were currently within the Top 10 lists of some of NY's top house DJs including Peter Rauhofer and Danny Tenaglia. He followed with "Who?" and "I don't care!" I then asked him to relenquish his "gay card" because he was requesting such a bad song and had no clue about two DJs/producers that have helped define the current house scene on a global level (not to mention produced tracks for people like Madonna, Cher, and other queer "icons"). He told me to [email protected]#$ off and that I didn't know what I was talking about. So, when you have an audience that thinks they know more about the music and the future of music than the DJ/producer/remixer, it's a lose-lose situation. I suspect similar scenarios have played out in many hip hop clubs around Jackson. I know I've heard several skilled hip hop DJs bitch about the same type of audience.

Author
kaust
Date
2006-12-05T19:47:34-06:00
ID
108684
Comment

There's something besides metal? Sorry, wrong thread. :D

Author
Ironghost
Date
2006-12-05T19:51:54-06:00
ID
108685
Comment

To finish and shutup... DJs have it rough in this town. Few view them as artists or even talented. They think of them as Deejays at a prom. DJs in most cities do not take requests and the audience gets that. The audience comes to hear the DJ's selection and respects the DJ for their particular vibe/sound and what can be a 4+ hour musical epic frenzied with rhythm and bass. The DJ is a rock star in those places whether it's in a hip hop, house, tech, or salsa club... The DJ is a god that controls the night. In Jackson, the DJ plays records and better accept requests.... And, don't expect a tip. ;-)

Author
kaust
Date
2006-12-05T19:55:31-06:00
ID
108686
Comment

well any deejay, in fact. i meant deejays other than hip-hop. hehe you're a snob ;) i like it. i didn't know any of those things about house/techno/etc. I'd just call it all techno, too. We should do a story about all of that soon.

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-05T19:56:34-06:00
ID
108687
Comment

Iron, FWIW, I've heard several Drum & Bass and hip hop tracks that involve metal. You'd be surprised at the samples electronic musicans use.

Author
kaust
Date
2006-12-05T19:57:29-06:00
ID
108688
Comment

Nickelback won the Billboard award? *sigh* I lost ALL respect for that band after the horribly misogynistic "Figured You Out," which is as nasty as anything Ludacris ever did. (Ditto Limp Bizkit's "Eat You Alive.") It really bums me out that hip-hop artists get busted for misogyny while white artists get left alone, but it's just representative of the same racial profiling that occurs everywhere else. I mean, at BEST, Nickelback is whiny. At worst, it's the musical equivalent to some angry loser who gropes women on the subway on his way home to google up a mail order bride. Ahem. Okay, that was a rant. Agreed that RHCP deserved that award. I am so tired of the macho-mallrat genre that seems to be dominating the rock scene right now--Nickelback, Papa Roach, und so weiter--where almost all of the songwriters sound like their emotional growth was stunted at age 14. I mean, say what you wills about dawgs with bling and cheap thrillz, packed to the gills with hundred dollar bills, all about sharpening the tips on their drills, all wrapped up in their rims and grillz, but at least it's not whiny crap about taking pills or Heather Mills written by some angry white boy from Beverly Hills who can't get laid with his poor social skills. Word. Knol, shades of Casey's question here, but on a NATIONAL level, who would be a really good accessible house artist to start off with? I love Moby, but I'm pretty sure he's not house. Cheers, TH

Author
Tom Head
Date
2006-12-05T20:10:05-06:00
ID
108689
Comment

ooh Tom going rap. flow, brotha, flow. Knol, being in Seattle (where I am now), the dj/crowd relationship is TOTALLY different. Saturday night, at a b-boy type show, people clapped for his selections. He controlled it all. Then in the middle, he hopped down and break-danced, which thrilled the hell out of everybody. Anyway, I totally know that difference.

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-05T20:13:49-06:00
ID
108690
Comment

I mean, say what you wills about dawgs with bling and cheap thrillz, packed to the gills with hundred dollar bills, all about sharpening the tips on their drills, all wrapped up in their rims and grillz, but at least it's not whiny crap about taking pills or Heather Mills written by some angry white boy from Beverly Hills who can't get laid with his poor social skills. Word. LOL! put that to a stong beat and a sharp guitar riff and you're good to go tom ;)

Author
William Patrick Butler
Date
2006-12-05T20:14:48-06:00
ID
108691
Comment

See, Casey, that intrigues me... You're so musically diverse and know crunk vs hip hop and indie vs alt.rock and electronica vs dance... But, if it has a 4/4 and is between 120-128 beats per minute, you'd simply call it techno. ;-) House is certainly one of the most diverse genres of music (right beside hip hop). It also happens to be an American music (like hip hop) made popular in Detroit, Chicago and NY. It ranges from salsa to disco to tribal to tech (I could seriously go on). Even further, you can often find elements of the waltz, bossa nova, and other classical elements along with primitive rhythms of tribal cultures around the world. Portugal, for instance, is the breeding ground for some of the sexiest, sweatiest tribal house on the market. Not hard to guess why... It literally reflects their heritage and their surroundings and doesn't even need words to do so. Anyway, house can be incredibly complex rhythmically and musically... It's a shame that most only hear a persistent beat they generalize as techno. No offense to you or anyone else. Before I go, I'm curious, Kaz. Are hip hop DJs and artists in the area suffering from the same or a similar scenario to what I gave above (several posts up)? And, finally, I'd love to see something I saw in NOLA and ATL a few years back... Hip hop and house mixing in a friendly way... The scenes mixing. All colors, all orientations, all classes dancing in an almost tribal fashion. Both scenes I happened upon fused the genres and it was amazing to see rich, suburban white kids with inner city blacks/whites/gays sharing a good, sweaty beat. These two genres seriously have the potential to unite the younger generations if those few nights were an indicator of the possibilities. OK... Seriously, I'm off. As you can tell, I can go on and on about house and music in general.

Author
kaust
Date
2006-12-05T20:18:46-06:00
ID
108692
Comment

That's why I really think it'd be good to do a story on it. If it's that greek to me (and I tend to try to find out things like that, though obviously I've really slacked), I know it's got to be unknown to most readers. But I think it is really fascinating. I'd love a tutor if you've got the interest in making a cd with footnotes on the differences. And maybe it's time for another JFP cross-genre music event. Sounds like it to me.

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-05T20:24:55-06:00
ID
108693
Comment

[quote]Iron, FWIW, I've heard several Drum & Bass and hip hop tracks that involve metal. You'd be surprised at the samples electronic musicans use.[/quote] Oh I wouldn't. I've heard stories about who has sued whom. :) My one experience with House/Trace/Electronica/Whatnot was when mp3.com was in full bloom, before Napster, and before the RIAA ruined it all. Carry On.

Author
Ironghost
Date
2006-12-05T20:30:08-06:00
ID
108694
Comment

If it's that greek to me (and I tend to try to find out things like that, though obviously I've really slacked), I know it's got to be unknown to most readers. yeah, i'm the same way c to the p. a good friend of mine tried to show me the difference to get me to stop calling it all "techno" but it just never clicked to me i'd love to read a story about it

Author
William Patrick Butler
Date
2006-12-05T20:35:22-06:00
ID
108695
Comment

"Knol, shades of Casey's question here, but on a NATIONAL level, who would be a really good accessible house artist to start off with? I love Moby, but I'm pretty sure he's not house." - Tom Tom, actually, Moby is a good start. He's all over the place from punk to house to classical to blues but his house stays pretty true. It's a bit pop lately but with D. Harry, what's to be expected!?! He's sickly happy though always a cynic -- exactly why I love him as an artist. As for house, it seriously would depend on what you're looking for. As I said, it can range from tech-house to salsa to epic house to Baeleric to house with soul-elements.... Tom, I think you'd probably be into progressive house moreso than most house that's out at the moment. Progressive house has a classical element to it. Very epic. I'll make one recommendation and we can go from there via email... Try Rabbit in the Moon (or RITM on P2P). They're old but genius. Their remix of Goldie's "Inner City Life" is incredible and their remix of Sarah McLachlan's "Possession" should be enough to let you get their basic approach to intelligent dance music. Still, they're progressive house and not necessarily house. As for house, you might like Deep Dish. They're mostly commercial but maintain a strong house element without bastardizing it completely. They've worked with Stevie Nicks, Everything but the Girl, and Richard Morel to name a few. Others you might find accessible and easy to listen to: Richard Morel (Morel), Danny Tenaglia, Nuyorican Soul, Funky Green Dogs, Murk, and Bob Sinclair. They're all commercial and should be easily found in iTunes. Of course, the true house collection would involve artists like Kraftwerk, Derrick May, Cajmere, Frankie Knuckles, Juan Atkins, and Kevin Saunderson. Those guys established the framework for the house genre. They're music is often minimalist and actually fits the definition of techno more than house only because house has evolved so much over the last 20+ years and remained mostly underground.

Author
kaust
Date
2006-12-05T20:48:23-06:00
ID
108696
Comment

And, while I'm slinging recommendations, EVERYONE into hip hop/spoken word/house, lookup Ursula Rucker. She's a Philly artist and has songs in all those genres. The woman is an incredibly strong lyricist whether backed by a house or hip hop beat. She has stayed true to intelligent lyrics that are mostly about inner-city life without getting all gangsta or hardcore. Her words are beautifully painful and flooded with emotion.

Author
kaust
Date
2006-12-05T20:54:08-06:00
ID
108697
Comment

so what do groups like mogwai and mum fall under, knol?

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-05T21:08:41-06:00
ID
108698
Comment

Personally, I'd label Mogwai and Mum prog-rock or maybe post-rock, if there is such a thing. By the way, I really like both. And, yes, Casey, I'm a bit of a music snob.... Especially when it comes to people treating a DJ as a talentless record-player. P.S. Sorry about the rant last night. ;-) I was feeling Kamikaze's words about bending to the audience. It seems too many have to do that in this state because the local audience simply doesn't get enough exposure to alot of new and/or non-commercial music; also, it seems most don't want that exposure. I suspect the problem may also explain why so few concerts make it this way.

Author
kaust
Date
2006-12-06T08:23:43-06:00
ID
108699
Comment

Terrible I know, but because of that, they dont respect them enough to listen to what they have to say. <<

Author
Queen601
Date
2006-12-06T10:02:45-06:00
ID
108700
Comment

j-town's got its own concious rappers, too, if people are more into that. 5th Child has got some great songs. listen <<<<

Author
Queen601
Date
2006-12-06T10:07:26-06:00
ID
108701
Comment

Queen, you are right on, here, as I see it. Composers, musicians, etc. have often in history had to struggle to make a living. Look at Mozart - broke and died young. Rappers have choices, too - they can work another job to make money. Maybe that means they can't do as many performances, but it might also mean they have money to produce a record themselves and make their own decisions about what goes on there. A lot of other kinds of recording artists have had to come up against "the industry" and it's never an easy fit, it seems. Lots of people have to make choices in their day to day lives about what they will and won't do to earn money. What kind of company they will work for, the values, etc. In my mind it's better to be true to your values & beliefs and work towards alternate production and distribution models where you don't have to compromise so much. But I do think there's something in Queen's idea about the community coming together to support rappers. Didn't communities in Africa do that with the artists called "griots" - these individuals were sort of social commentators, plus musicians, comedians, etc. It's not that I think rappers shouldn't be paid, I just don't agree with the notion that "I gotta make a living" gives you license to put forth ideas you really don't feel that good about.

Author
Izzy
Date
2006-12-06T10:22:33-06:00
ID
108702
Comment

Queen, oh how I wish your comments were true about all preachers today. I know many who are making mint. I know of one in Los Angeles who makes over a million at least, but no one knows for sure what he makes. Not even the folks who are supposed to know knows his true salary. I've represented a few churches. The interworking of some churches will scare you too death. Queen, you should become a hip hop contributor to the JFP. I think you'll be perfect for the task. You're a good writer and you know hip hop.

Author
Ray Carter
Date
2006-12-06T10:23:29-06:00
ID
108703
Comment

Amen, Laurel.

Author
Ray Carter
Date
2006-12-06T10:25:57-06:00
ID
108704
Comment

To answer your question Knol...YES, Hiphop DJ's here are faced with the sam dilemma. They are basically there to appease their crowd. whereas in techno/drum and bass/house circles where the DJ is the star...here the DJ is only a vessel fro us to be entertained. He is faceless and could be nameless really for all most folks care. Then...you have CLUB OWNERS who have become program dirctors almost. They hire DJS to play what THEY and their friends personally like. Really in most clubs here you could put in a mix cd a let it play and as long as the current club hits are on it folks wouldnt even recognize that there is no physical person in the booth. The best place to go to see DJs in action spinning classics, some onn vinyl is Seven Studioz on Fridays. A techno/drum and bass/ event would work there.

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-06T10:56:09-06:00
ID
108705
Comment

Queen..I choose to let my actions speak louder than my words. By those I let folks know...IM KAMIKAZE IM DIFFERENT>>>I WANT TO HELP.....and then...I help. I may be lumped in with the crowd but only until people see my philanthropy. That has been my pledge. The last thing kids want is to be preached to so I steer away from blatant messages instead opting to coax the listener in with subtle nuances. By gaining their trust and respect its easier to relate. Such is the reason that kids shun teachers, pastors, and parents these days. They feel th proverbial finger being wagged at them. ironically, they will sit down and listen and adhere to words of say...a young jeezy speaking in person to them than a pastor or a teacher. I choose to increas the chances of my being effective. Laurel...never been a case where I recorded somthing that i was ashamed of or didnt want to record in the first place..I stand by everything ive ever said or recorded on record because they came from a real place and real experiences. I would never compromise the music with lies. Fact is...sex drugs and violenc exist and these kids are privvy to it. Som of thm hav fallen victim to it and those that havent want to hear positive words from someone who they feel has a fram of reference. i.e someone with AIDS speaking on safe-sex. an ex-convicted drug dealer preaching the ills of drug addiction. Gangbangers saying that banging isnt cool. Guess what...thats what a lot of these rappers are...ex-somebodys who have actually been where these kids are. Iv been where they are, Banner has been where they are. We cant apologize because they bought th music or respectus more than say a conscious rapper. we have to change that climate I agree. But untill then you have to put your product in a form that will b commercially viable. Why? because....say it with me people...THATS WHAT SELLS!!!

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-06T11:09:40-06:00
ID
108706
Comment

and yes casey its time for that show :-) if Knol and Laurel know sum folks from their genres who are open minded and willing to share a bill then it can be done and can be a profitable little diddy to boot.

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-06T11:11:18-06:00
ID
108707
Comment

hey, I'm all about that. Ezra Brown and I have been talking about doing folk/neo soul thing with Thabi Moyo on spoken word, me on acoustic guitar and vocals. I like it, let's do it at Seven...cross genre like Kamikaze has been saying all along... Knol, thanks for the Ursula Rucker link

Author
Izzy
Date
2006-12-06T11:13:26-06:00
ID
108708
Comment

and Kamikaze, I didn't mean to imply you had recorded something you don't feel proud of. I'm glad you can say that you feel proud of your work.

Author
Izzy
Date
2006-12-06T11:14:40-06:00
ID
108709
Comment

oh and with percussion, too, gotta have a beat

Author
Izzy
Date
2006-12-06T11:19:40-06:00
ID
108710
Comment

Let me ask you this Kaze, is it more important to you to be a rapper or more important to be one who can easily say that he works towards the good of his community. I am confused. It seems like in order to be a responsible, informed, positive rapper you have to accept that it won't be a lucrative lifestyle. I feel that if rappers like you and Banner continue to do this "thing" that you feel you must do in an effort to reach kids that we will never get to the end result that you and I both seek. You mentioned the kids not liking to be preached to....who does? However, that doesn't mean that sending another message all together will work. What needs to happen is that the approach should be altered not changed. You cant' say that I am a positive roll model to these kids while speaking at their school and then they put your cd in and your talking about how much weed you smoke and how many heads you bang. Obviously that will be more attractive than what they heard from you at the assembly earlier that week....when you told them to stay in school....what will matter is what they heard in your songs that is easier for them to identify with. I am not challenging you decisions on your own lifestyle. What I am trying to convey is that what you have decided will help these kids, in fact, is working against them. It would be one thing to have a steadfast place that you demonstrate. But the going back and forth and leaving them with an option on what part of your message they choose to let lead them, will ultimately put us right back in the same spot that we so eagerly tred to get pass. And, if you are not rich by now doing what you are doing, then clearly you should consider another means of getting it done. Basically this goes back to my original question, what is of most importance to you....being rich and famous by selling what these kids want to hear OR being moderately financially successful and telling these kids what they NEED to hear. So what if it doesn't make U rich, it could make them rich one day and even alter their entire life and thinking pattern. Wouldn't that be of more value? At what point do you begin to sacrafice? How important is it to you that these kids are saved from themselves, society and other rappers who don't have any notion of what power hip hop has to heal, save, instruct and preserve????

Author
Queen601
Date
2006-12-06T11:38:28-06:00
ID
108711
Comment

Im all for it Laurel...always have been. Ive found though that folks in the rock, folk, and neo-soul genres are not always as willing and as open as they say they are to cross-genre shows. The fans of those genres are not always as open as they say to seeing a hiphop show.. of course we're the red-headed stepchildren of music. A lot of folks in the spoken word cliques 'round here dis hiphop. (though they don't know I know it) would your fans REALLY be willing to pay to see a show had you sandwiched between say me and another hiphop act? and would they stay? good questions I think.

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-06T11:39:34-06:00
ID
108712
Comment

Oh and Ray I am totally in agreement with you about the preachers. But this is a society issue. Preachers are not as they once were, I know that. However, it is not the norm that preachers commit to the pulpit in an effort to "get paid", is it? If so, we are in way more trouble than figuring out which path a rapper should take to make an impact on our kids. That would mean that there is little difference in preaching and rapping. And it would proove the notion that money is the root of everything (good and evil). And writing for the JFP on hiphop, ya think? :-)

Author
Queen601
Date
2006-12-06T11:41:20-06:00
ID
108713
Comment

and queen...."It seems like in order to be a responsible, informed, positive rapper you have to accept that it won't be a lucrative lifestyle." YES!!!! at least on a local or indpendent level. Now dont get it twisted. Common, Kanye, Lupe, Rhymefest, and the like are NOT starving. that is a misnomer. Common has Gap ads. Lupe has shoe deals, Rhymefest co-wrote Jesus Walks. They aren't starving becuase to a certain degree they have a major machine behind them. they do good enough numbers to make GREAT tour money. A video is a great thing...even if you're a conscious rapper. But here and regionally name me ONE conscious rapper or one rapper here that does anything positive outside of what Banner and i have done? Name me one that you've PAID to go see. name me one that youve BOUGHT a cd from? I can be a rapper Queen AND work for the good of my community. What I spit on a record is not necessarily the measuring stick by which my good deeds can b measured. Look at the Banner controversy.

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-06T11:48:26-06:00
ID
108714
Comment

"would your fans REALLY be willing to pay to see a show had you sandwiched between say me and another hiphop act? and would they stay? good questions I think." - Kamikaze Based on my epxerience with OUToberfest, the bulk of folk rock fans would leave but a portion would stay. At Ofest, we had several folk/rock acts early and closed the evening with hip hop and rap. I'd say approximately 75% of the audience left between the folk headliner and the hip hop/rap opener. That's not to say if it were more effectively mixed rather than sandwiched or segregated it wouldn't work. I think people would dig what Laurel and Thabi do... Lay a hip hop beat (something we've talked about a few times) behind their stuff and you basically have trip hop or electronica (for lack of a better term). Throw in an MC and you've mashed multi-genres together. For instance, let's say I tracked some hip hop rhythms or similar samples and loops (even bass, pads, etc), Kamikaze MC'd, Laurel provided guitar riffs (and possibly loops) and vocals, and Thabi pushed more vocals and spoken word... The possibilities are pretty limitless. Alternate some funky beats, house beats, filtered rock beats, etc and you can shift the whole vibe. Easy potential to create something a la Fugees, Portishead, Tricky, Lamb, Black Eyed Peas, Outkast, etc... The list goes on of popular groups that are mashing these genres without necessarily bastardizing them or their message. Would people in Jacktown like it? I can't help but think it's all in the marketing -- from street teams, to MySpace, to podcasts, to shows, etc.

Author
kaust
Date
2006-12-06T12:01:15-06:00
ID
108715
Comment

what's the banner controversy? I am loving reading this debate. Is it possible to mix in just a few concious songs per album, amidst the bust the weed and bangers? Is it possible to make a concious song something that is inordinately catchy, that makes you want to wil' out in the club? Something that relieves that stress but then stays in your head while you're trying to sleep at night, (whispering these preachings here, not shouting, cause we're still having fun)

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-06T12:01:47-06:00
ID
108716
Comment

I really think yall should try this show. Pimp the hell out of it. Do a good JFP story on it. Poster the hell out of schools (seriously, poster). Secure kids at each school who will talk people into going. Cause that's what would make someone at Millsaps go. If a couple of key people said, "I'm going. Why don't you come, too?" It'd happen.

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-06T12:04:19-06:00
ID
108717
Comment

seems like multi-genre line ups work in the setting of a benefit, like the one MAP and Kamikaze did after Katrina. At least, I thought it worked. But for a regular show...? It's funny, innit? Like folks need a cause in order to cross boundaries. Casey, I loved your last post.

Author
Izzy
Date
2006-12-06T12:06:09-06:00
ID
108718
Comment

very true, Laurel. When I was doing the Collective, the same was true. Maybe the cause can just be reconcilliation? Do some ads boasting that. which post, Laurel, dear?

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-06T12:19:39-06:00
ID
108719
Comment

and Queen, I definitely think you should be writing in the JFP. Or making your voice heard in some way.

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-06T12:20:43-06:00
ID
108720
Comment

What I spit on a record is not necessarily the measuring stick by which my good deeds can b measured.<<<

Author
Queen601
Date
2006-12-06T12:21:11-06:00
ID
108721
Comment

They rap about the hood and the drugs and the guns....therefore, I turn a def ear, I hear enough of that. As much pain and hurt and as many struggles as we go through right here in Jackson, there should be more support for these rappers....for you and for Banner. I think Banner has confused his fans because he's jumping from one image to another and I think you are headed for that same situation. My personal opinion. I think it's a waste. I googled Crooked Lettaz as you advised us to do and what I found was lyrics you wrote from a song that I can't even tell you but it left me missing that from Kamikaze. I had almost forgotten that there was that much left to you...being honest. Don't get me wrong I'm a fan of all your work because I've been following you so long that I know what you are capable of. HOwever, it's those uncompromising lyrics of stregnth, knowledge and courage that we don't get from you now a days because you got to do what you got to do. In the meantime our kids don't know that side of you. and they need too!

Author
Queen601
Date
2006-12-06T12:21:43-06:00
ID
108722
Comment

"I'd say approximately 75% of the audience left between the folk headliner and the hip hop/rap opener." Therein lies the problem with this idea Knol. and thus my frustration. Fans of those genres talk but are not REALLY open to giving other music a chance. How depressing was it for the hiphop headliners(and if Im not mistaken the female duo from new york) to be in the crowd watching the other acts perform to a bigger crowd then watch them dissapate when its their time to perform. Ive been there...and it sucks! I play to packed clubs now. and Id have to say(and I dont know how Laurel or Thabi would feel) Id feel hella desrespected if a crowd walked out on me after LAurel performed. If diversity is what we're screaming then how do we get folks to stay and watch....and consequently learn? The whole jam-band idea is good but Id like for Laurel's and Thabi's fans to see what I do in its full splendor and vice-versa to learn to appreciate it and maybe one-day buy it. ya know? The idea would work with a lotta brainpower and a lot of talking and cross-promoting. I just get scared because it usually shows that we talk a good game but don't really mean to support all other genres here. And THAT is vital for our music scene to thrive.

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-06T12:36:48-06:00
ID
108723
Comment

"My neices and nephews go with whoever's the hottest, meaning, whatever rapper everyone talks about. So, then, they don't care anything about the fact that you are writing informative columns for JFP.." EXACTLY QUEEN!!!!!! And if Im the "hottest" that means for whatever reason I can grab their attention. And if from that, I can reach ONE of them then Ive accomplished something. If "Bust Yo Head To The White MEat" or "U Sked" put enough light on me to where they're excited about me coming to their school then BAM!!! that means that they'll be starstruck long enough to listen to my words. And again I may not reach them all but if one takes waht I say to heart then thats one you can chalk up for our side! But I have to garner that interest first and right now (not saying this wont change) a conscious rapper wouldnt get the time of day in JPS! doesnt make it right but its true and you can't preach to the choir.

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-06T12:42:54-06:00
ID
108724
Comment

Kamikaze, I feel you...really I do. However, I just can't understand and maybe it's because I am not a rapper. I just can't see why you don't see that that is only confusing the kid. Children are going to align themselves with things that make life "fresh" for them. They sit in your assembly the entire time thinking about your outfit, your songs, how many women you got, what kind of car you drive. Why, because you have already given them the notion that that's what you are about from the songs they hear on the radio. I am certain that they are not concentrating on your positive statements one day out of the year. When they hear a contradictory statement from you thru your music 5 times a day on the radio. Do you see my point? That's why you have to focus on reaching one student instead of reaching them all. You've limited yourself to reaching them right from the very start. You have to display a difference from the regular in order for your words to even matter to them. I hear all the time "Common cool, but I don't buy his album". Do you know what that means, they know that he has something positive to offer, but it is not money worthy. It doesn't fit with "cool and fresh" to them. However, they do know what they will get if and when they listen to Common. So yes, Common may not have massive record sales, but he has set the precedent for himself and those who long to be encouraged and informed, will look to common for that. Please tell me you at least see my point, even if you don't agree. Cuz it's getting more and more difficult to make my point plain to you.

Author
Queen601
Date
2006-12-06T12:53:19-06:00
ID
108725
Comment

The idea would work with a lotta brainpower and a lot of talking and cross-promoting. what about the resources of the M.A.P. coalition?

Author
nyoung
Date
2006-12-06T12:56:17-06:00
ID
108726
Comment

"he puts out another album as a hard core gangsta as if well looking out for these kids and talking about God didn't get me paid so "F" that. " ..And thats truly not fair to that man to make that statement. Just as we said on the radio show on Monday. Its EASY...VERY EASY to say these things when youre NOT in that position. You cant quantify a mans experiences unless you've lived them. Banner and I have lived them. We made a 90 percent conscious album when were signed. Deemed a classic by hiphop fans, mags, and websites til this day. and NOBODY bought it. Banner and I were broke by the end of the year after our album was released in APRIL of that year. In fact Queen the TWO non-coscious records on that album were the hits! LOL FIrewater and Get Crunk... Again I repeat. THE ONLY TWO NON-CONSCIOUS SONGS FROM THAT ALBUM WERE THE SONGS THAT FOLKS MOST LIKED AND WANTED TO SEE US PERFORM!!! Banner has released 4 albums and is a bonafide superstar would you have him come back to Jackson and work stock at Target so he could maintain what some think is integrity in his music? Will you be there for him when folks walk by laughing at him calling him the "big time rapper" working at "Target". When folks have a field day on blogs talking about the "fall" of the great rapper" NO! you won't so you can't always assume you know what someone should do. ITs easy to say that from where you're standing. ITs a lof more difficult when hiphop is your passion. Id have to say that even now my expectations for this industry are different, When I was 21 I was a bright-eyed bushytailed backpack rapper that battled in ciphers and wanted to change the world but once I saw the dirty underbelly of it all(which a lot of you cant say that you have) I realized that #1 should be making yourself financially stable. go to ozonemag.com and read the article on hiphop reparations. Hiphop legend Dana Dane is a BARTENDER now after all he's given to the game. Kool Herc the man who CREATED this culture we know as hiphop was carted off because he was not allowed admittance to a club where a HIPHOP show was taking place. Swallow that! these are not made up stories people this is happening TODAY! research it.

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-06T13:04:14-06:00
ID
108727
Comment

"what about the resources of the M.A.P. coalition?" well...that goes without saying. We're here and have always been ready to start something like this... But again MAP's support has been VERY slim from the ROCK and FOLK genres why? don't know. But the organization was created for them too. ...AND QUEEN I DO SEE YOUR POINT. BUT...DO YOU SEE MINE?

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-06T13:08:03-06:00
ID
108728
Comment

I think the concept would work if there was no billed headliner. ALL are headliners. Makes sense? I love it when Kaze speaks from the heart like this. And I have a HUGE crush on Skipp Coon in a total platonic way since I'm married. Great thread.

Author
emilyb
Date
2006-12-06T13:16:35-06:00
ID
108729
Comment

And thats truly not fair to that man to make that statement. Just as we said on the radio show on Monday. Its EASY...VERY EASY to say these things when youre NOT in that position<<<

Author
Queen601
Date
2006-12-06T13:21:57-06:00
ID
108730
Comment

Okay Kaze I see your point. Still in all I guess we shouldn't look to rappers to be the savior for the kids. I guess we do that because the identify so easily with hip hop culture. However, i suppose it is unfair to look to mere men to accept that as their place in society. Frankly, I can't see why being a positive role model couldn't be just as lucrative as being a rapper. I mean when Dana Dane was doing his thang they weren't making bookoos of lute, were they? NO they were breaking the grain, they were starting a new struggle. Maybe that's the type of rapper we need from the south. One who is willing to go beyond and sacrafice himself, his career, his money for the good of the people. How dare we expect someone with your intelligence, and conviction to lead our kids and not make money. That's ridiculous of us. Matter of fact all our leaders should be rich. Martin Luther King and Malcolm X were rolling in dough weren't they. They did and took all their money with them and left us nothing to show for their existence..... (that's sarcasm).

Author
Queen601
Date
2006-12-06T13:27:42-06:00
ID
108731
Comment

I love it when Kaze speaks from the heart like this.>>>>emilyb As do I emilyb, you just have no idea....

Author
Queen601
Date
2006-12-06T13:31:35-06:00
ID
108732
Comment

Emily, I hear Skipp is playing to run for mayor. Seriously.

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2006-12-06T13:32:40-06:00
ID
108733
Comment

I think there's this thing that only artists can understand...but wish others did. Sure we put ourselves out there and opinions will be formed. But those opinions are usually based upon a small part of who we are. There is ONE part of me that is bitchy, catty...especially when I'm hormonal like these days. Lots of women GET that. Some don't. Some men do. Some don't. Sometimes I'm very community aware and I write based on that. Sometimes I write based on my family and write "domestic" stuff. Sometimes I'm so blocked with the everything I can't write at all. However, I'll still stand behind everything I write because in that moment it was "true" for me and someone might feel it. I can't control what others will like best or what will "sell". Yes. I do want to make money though. So that's where there's a delicate balance. It's a very gray area and artists are more than "this" or "that". That's what I love about Kamikaze. I GET that when he talks about it. I GET that when Jay Z talks about it. I don't think anyone does any art JUST for the bucks or the attention, but if I can use anything for good I will. Fixing our communities is not he burden of the artists or the fans or the every day person. It's our burden as a whole and we all have to do our lititle bit to make it better. It's easy to idolize those who put themselves out there and expect perfection of them.

Author
emilyb
Date
2006-12-06T13:35:46-06:00
ID
108734
Comment

I can say, it's true that at the events I've been at, the hip-hop crowd has been more likely to sit around and listen to Goodman County, but the rock/country/indie crowd does clear out. But maybe we shouldn't be leaving the rappers for last. I know headliners go last, but maybe it's time to switch it up a little bit. Maybe every body could play two sets (or does that take too long to set up?) I think it's interesting because rap is all over pop radio. White kids like hip-hop. So how do we get them to stay? And I think there should be a dance party in there at the end (Phinga?) Seriously, I think yall should start meeting and working to make it happen. You've got to get reps from each school to pledge to be a street team, though.

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-06T13:37:07-06:00
ID
108735
Comment

Skipp's going to run for mayor? As Joecephus or as Skipp? When?

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-06T13:38:56-06:00
ID
108736
Comment

Oh, I hope I didn't spill the beans. But he talks openly about it—and, hey, future mayors ought to know to tell a journalist something is off the record. ;-) Personally, it would be much fun to type Jackson Mayor Skipp Coon. He would definitely be an improvement over our current mayor.

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2006-12-06T13:40:59-06:00
ID
108737
Comment

"How dare we expect someone with your intelligence, and conviction to lead our kids and not make money" ..You were being sarcastic Queen but in actuality you asked a great question. Why does conviction mean you have to be broke? Is it wrong for anyone to want to be paid for their hard work. Do you love your job enough to do it everday even after hours and get no check? Ask yourself that? We're in the Bush era Quenn and you cant fault man or woman for trying to make a dollar. Its what ya need to buy food, clothes, and water. the bare necessities. You're again asking SOMEONE ELSE...not yourself by the way to sacrifice themselves and their financial well-being for a people. Martin should have got paid AND Malcolm deserved to get paid. As I told the caller on the mornign show Monday. If anyone's prepared to cloth my kids for me. Buy my groceries and gas or the like then Ill denounce all that is crunk TODAY and bring some of the old "Crooked Lettaz" Kaze back. No prob. We can REALLY mash on the system! I was happier then anyway. But...

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-06T13:42:55-06:00
ID
108738
Comment

I'd heard that mayor rumor for a while. And I LOVE it. I about tripped over myself going to find him at Lynette's party. Well said Kamikaze. We all do make sacrifices. And that's coming from a woman who wants to snatch the hair off those who write mysogynistic lyrics. :P

Author
emilyb
Date
2006-12-06T13:47:43-06:00
ID
108739
Comment

Maybe he ought to sign you up to do his media, Emily. ;-)

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2006-12-06T13:49:14-06:00
ID
108740
Comment

I think it would be cool, too, if people like laurel and others joined the MAP coalition to take it to that next level, Kaze. And I do want a copy of grey skies. I listened to little clips on amazon yesterday and am stoked.

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-06T13:53:20-06:00
ID
108741
Comment

And I do want a copy of grey skies. I listened to little clips on amazon yesterday and am stoked. as did i c to the p and i wouldn't mind a copy either i'll even pick the most conscious track on their and put it on the JFP Podcast ;)

Author
William Patrick Butler
Date
2006-12-06T14:00:40-06:00
ID
108742
Comment

Well, I did go to a MAP meeting once, and liked it. But being honest, I felt I was out of place. Maybe I needed to stick it out more. I do think it would feel good to have a better sense of connection or coalition among musicians of various genres, especially when there's a certain level of the "good old boys" network that seems to dominate the folk/rock/blues scene. To me, anyway. Not that most individuals are not friendly, because they are. But still, there seems to be a hugely predominantly male bias in live music in Jacktown. Except for the Chick Ball, that is. And BTW I definitely give kudos to Kamikaze for that Katrina benefit which did bring together the genres. As for folks leaving, I am guilty of being the person who takes off at 10:30 pm - why? Because I frikkin fall asleep by then. Lame, maybe. But hey, that's partly why I play earlier sets, I like that time frame (7 - 10) I'm at my best then. I know it's against the norm but I don't like the whole opening act, then the next biggest dude and so on til the final hurrah at 2 am. That's not my scene in terms of timing but also in terms of value. It's naive maybe, but I think that creates a kind of hierarchy that in some ways is fake. But now I am really going against the grain. Of course I am someone whose favorite performances are often those by amateurs. I love to see people take a risk and try something they haven't tried.

Author
Izzy
Date
2006-12-06T14:08:45-06:00
ID
108743
Comment

If anyone's prepared to cloth my kids for me. Buy my groceries and gas or the like then Ill denounce all that is crunk TODAY and bring some of the old "Crooked Lettaz" Kaze back. No prob.<<.....Is that all it takes???? I'mmo let you make it on that issue right there. Obviously this is beyond my comprehension. Therefore, congratulations on all that you do, have done, and will hopefully continue to do. I just hope that at the end of the day what you've done will give your spirit a good rest. If so, then that's all that matters. You gotta do what's best for you. And to answer your question, NOPE....I am not doing my life's work. I am working like most, just to make ends meet and to have some sort of enjoyment in life. However, if i made a conscious decision to follow a not so normal way of life like persuing an acting career, or a rap career or whatever, and I could afford to put everything to the side and just do that....I certainly would. But it has been my experience that someone has got to do the work, since everyone else is rapping.

Author
Queen601
Date
2006-12-06T14:09:15-06:00
ID
108744
Comment

Well it's true, too, that people who stay for the rap don't show up for the earlier (i mean first few) performances either. It does often come down to timing, which is why I think maybe if you switched it up some people would find new things to like. And I can imagine it might feel strange, Laurel, to be the one folkie in a bunch of emcees . Maybe a big event could have lots of people joining up to the MAP coalition then (hopefully) that momentum would spill into the next meeting?

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-06T14:11:50-06:00
ID
108745
Comment

casey, I tried to contact you via the e-mail that you put in that post way on back up there....but it said my message would be sent to brian. I don't brian is interest in contacting me....:-) So how bout you just get at me with your story ideas at [email]jacktownchic2003@yahoo.com[/email] K. Look forward to it.

Author
Queen601
Date
2006-12-06T17:35:03-06:00
ID
108746
Comment

And I've been so involved in my dialogue with Kaze,that I neglected to comment on the show yall are pondering over. Firstly, as a hip hop fan I can tell you that hip hop artists going at the end of the show is best. I tell you why....it separates those who dont' desire to hear hip hop. What needs to be done is that organization of these shows needs to improve. If an artist is to go on stage at 12. Then act number three can't still be on stage at 11:30 when you have 7 acts. People have to learn to abide by the rules. If their set is 20 minutes, at 21 minutes after, their mics should be disconnected, turned off and they should leave stage. If I pay money to see a headliner and he doesn't get on stage until after the majority of the crowd has gone....so, i'm staying to see who I paid to see. Problem is, yall act like people are as open minded to different types of music as you all seem to be. I personally don't want to sit through country music waiting to see a hip hop artist. I'd rather not even come until it's time for the artist that I want to see is on stage. I'm sure I'm not the only one that feels that way. I'm sure that people who listen to majority rock, doesn't want to sit through neo/soul waiting on their favorite rock band. And that won't change because you all put all of them on a show trying to broaden their music minds.

Author
Queen601
Date
2006-12-06T17:41:39-06:00
ID
108747
Comment

There are only two types of music. Music you like and music you dislike. There is no such thing as good art. It’s all an expression. Problem is too many people are expressing themselves with the hope of commercial gain. When this happens I don’t view them as artists, they’re businesses. Therefore I cannot be upset or disappointed in their actions. If the world says we want death metal they will find a guitar. They don’t care. As much as kaze believes that he is speaking to these children, I cannot believe that he is making as much progress as he claims. Why, music does not meet their unmet needs. Another way to view it like this, in the bible, Paul writes a letter and in this letter he asks a man, how can he be a Jew and live like the gentiles and expect the gentiles to live like Jews. This do as I say and not as I do mentality is not going to be effective. I am an artist. Therefore I create. I cannot let a group of children tell me what to do. Well I be rich and famous and on cribs from rap music. Probably not. I’m cool with that. My mom didn’t have a million dollars I played little league and got my hair cut every two weeks. At some point artists must understand that to be an artist is to be underappreciated. It’s okay. It only makes me create more. That makes me happy. If I never make a dime off of rap music, I will marry the woman I love and raise a family. Music is my escape and at this point I love it, but I won’t bust heads to make it happy. And that’s the truth…Sho Nuff. p.s. buy my record on Thursday at the art mix

Author
skipp
Date
2006-12-06T23:35:58-06:00
ID
108748
Comment

"And that won't change because you all put all of them on a show trying to broaden their music minds." - Queen On one hand I'll agree with you... On the other, I see what Lollapalooza did for music. It introduced hip hop to rock and alt to hip hop and punk and electronica to all of them... Other scenes like Coachella thrive on the very concept of mixing genres and exposure of new and unheard ofs... And people fly from all over the world for the experience. So, I agree on on hand but still disagree. Typical Libra.

Author
kaust
Date
2006-12-07T08:31:39-06:00
ID
108749
Comment

And, Queen, how do you hear new artists if you don't stick around to hear them? Just curious. I'm very open to music and will sit through pure crap just to make sure I don't like it. Hard to form an opinion without first checking it out. I realize you're saying "the majority" isn't this way, but that is the problem with the majority and why America is quickly becoming an idiot nation.

Author
kaust
Date
2006-12-07T08:35:44-06:00
ID
108750
Comment

I'm very open to music and will sit through pure crap just to make sure I don't like it. -Knol (laughing) this is great comment. Me, I think turning on to new music has a lot to do with the setting you hear it in. Like if a good friend plays a CD for you, all the while you vibe off their enjoyment, so it becomes more real to you, more interesting.

Author
Izzy
Date
2006-12-07T13:29:35-06:00
ID
108751
Comment

p.s. skipp, where is your disc on sale & what's the name of it? I will buy it.

Author
Izzy
Date
2006-12-07T13:36:47-06:00
ID
108752
Comment

Queen can I ask you something? I haven't gone to a hip hop show and I was curious if it is kind of a dance party plus a concert, like does everyone dance or do folks sit and listen. I'm curious...

Author
Izzy
Date
2006-12-07T13:45:29-06:00
ID
108753
Comment

Knol writes: Tom, I think you'd probably be into progressive house moreso than most house that's out at the moment. Progressive house has a classical element to it. Very epic. I'll make one recommendation and we can go from there via email... Try Rabbit in the Moon (or RITM on P2P). They're old but genius. Their remix of Goldie's "Inner City Life" is incredible and their remix of Sarah McLachlan's "Possession" should be enough to let you get their basic approach to intelligent dance music. Still, they're progressive house and not necessarily house. I missed this the first time around, but now's worth mentioning: Would you believe I actually have, and LOVE, RITM's remix of "Possession"? I just had no idea who they were. Great, great stuff. And you may be absolutely right on progressive house--I absolutely love prog-rock, and it sounds like there are some similarities... More to follow by email, Sensei. Arigato gozaimasu! Cheers, Tom

Author
Tom Head
Date
2006-12-07T14:01:45-06:00
ID
108754
Comment

hey laurel, I want to do a story getting you and Queen to interview each other on your different scenes. One of my reporters should contact you. You can ask those kinds of questions!

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-07T14:02:13-06:00
ID
108755
Comment

Ahhhhhh...I see my arch-nemesis Skip Coon has chimed in yet again so that we can rehash our loooooongstanding debate LOLOL. ...actually I feel my words to these kids DOES indeed make a change partially because some have told me so. Out of a class of 30 if I reach one or two who were headed down the wrong path then Ive made a difference. Let me disagree with you...Im an artist..in no uncertain terms. After the Tommy boy/Gry Skies debacle I learned howver that I was artist who better get on top of his business! No one balked at Prince, who we all know is an 'artist' in fact TH 'artist' LOL, when he wanted control of his masters and a bigger cut from his records. That's the biz skippy. Why should you or I not want the same? I create. Period! Im an artist that knows his business! You say...how can you change what these kids do when you are doing the same thing...what kind of example are you setting? Well...I kinda think being a cum laude graduate with a bachelors in communications, self=employed, devoted father, and community activist who happens to rap...is a pretty good example to set. Mind you that is my focus when I talk to these kids. They dont see jewelery, fancy cars, or a house on cribs. they see a regular guy tangible and accessible who stresses education above all else. I think thats a good enough model don't you. When kids hear that...and they're not as stupid as older folks make them out to be...they realize "bust yo head to the white meat" is what it is...a damn good hit record!! At the same time its a blessing that they actually dig my music and give a damn when I come speak. Believe it or not it does make a difference. ...NO...HELL NO being an artist doesnt mean I have to be underappreciated and it also doesnt mean I have to starve doin it either Music is my passion AND my profession.. i doubt there are many here who eat, sleep, and breathe hiphop like I do. I am happiest when Im on stage or in a club and hundreds of people are reciting the words to one of my songs. That's love! Don't fault me because I want to keep getting that feeling. Nxt week I may come up with my "Jesus Walks" and if that works GREAT!!!! I work on it EVERYDAY....But the fans said they liked "White Meat" and by golly in one way or another Imma give it to em till they tell me they want something else!!!!

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-07T16:47:44-06:00
ID
108756
Comment

And seriously...I debate to prove a point but the reality is...anyone who has picked up any of my albums knows that I always put positive-thought provoking songs on my albums. I always drop sum jewels in my lines...Its there and always wil be. But I do try to make something for EVERYONE on my albums. there's conscious but there's the gangasta s--t and there's the club bangers, and the on record that's gonna get JMI and 97.7 to keep showing me Love :-) So in the end we all want the same thing. At least I think so.

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-07T16:52:39-06:00
ID
108757
Comment

I will say, I hardly ever hear Kamikaze talked about without someone remarking about how freaking smart he is, about how he went to college. And it's not just white folks. One article I read in a hip-hop magazine was all slanged out with a remark and what up brotha is educated, too, man. And I doubt they're all reading your JFP stuff, but I know at least of some people I've interviewed who said they ONLY read the JFP to see what Kamikaze has to say. And that's black high schoolers, too. "Jesus Walks" is awesome, though. I love how it just dares deejays to play it.

Author
casey
Date
2006-12-07T17:03:08-06:00
ID
108758
Comment

Kaze: You are doing it wrong. You need to be referring to yourself in the Third person, not the First Person. This would've sounded MUCH better: And seriously...Kaze debates to prove a point but the reality is...anyone who has picked up any of Kaze's albums knows that he always puts positive-thought provoking songs on his albums. Kaze always drop sum jewels in his lines...Its there and always wil be. But Kaze tries to make something for EVERYONE on his albums. there's conscious but there's the gangasta s--t and there's the club bangers, and the on record that's gonna get JMI and 97.7 to keep showing Kaze Love :-) So in the end we all want the same thing. At least Jaze thinks so.

Author
Kingfish
Date
2006-12-07T17:52:25-06:00
ID
108759
Comment

Nah..hadnt reached that level yet LOL...

Author
Kamikaze
Date
2006-12-08T12:05:45-06:00

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