A New Sheriff In Town? | Jackson Free Press | Jackson, MS

A New Sheriff In Town?

Photos by Brian Johnson, Roy Adkins, Nate Glenn, Darren Schwindaman, and Jaro Vacek

Sheriff Malcolm McMillin is familiar with opposition, having faced it and triumphed in repeated elections since he was first elected sheriff of Hinds County 16 years ago.

This time, three Democrats are at his heels, blaming him for a whole host of problems in Jackson and surrounding communities, and calling for a change of leadership.

"Am I scared? Of course, I'm scared," McMillin said. "You either run unopposed, or you run scared. That's the life of any politician around election time."

There are no Republican contenders for the office in heavily Democratic Hinds County, so the battle begins and ends with the Aug. 7 primaries. McMillin's Democratic opponents are city spokesman Tyrone Lewis, former city code enforcement officer Lester Williams—both of Jackson—and pulpwood truck driver Henry Grigsby, of Utica.

McMillin has withstood challenges before, but this year, his opponents have come out swinging, accusing the sheriff of neglecting Jackson, failing to work well with other agencies and needlessly antagonizing the supervisors. McMillin, for his part, says that his opponents lack the experience to see Hinds County through this troubled time, and he believes that at least two of them are running at the behest of Mayor Frank Melton.

The Inside Out
Both Lewis and Williams accuse McMillin of neglecting Jackson, which suffered a 42 percent increase in violent crime last year.

"A lot of people think he's just restricted to the rural areas, but his jurisdiction is county-wide," Lewis said. "He's just as responsible for crime in Jackson as the Jackson Police Department. And it's time that (the sheriff's office) be held accountable, as well as the Jackson Police Department."

Williams accuses the sheriff of being detached from Jackson's problems and uncooperative with the police.

"An open relationship between the two agencies, number one, would increase manpower. Number two, it could decrease the overtime budget because pairing up and working together and developing those relationships. You'll see more deputies deployed in the city of Jackson, working hand-in-hand with the Jackson Police Department. Developing those relationships is one aspect."

Williams also wants to use McMillin's office to cover holes in the Jackson Police Department's head count.

"I plan to develop a true working relationship with local law enforcement agencies. I name, in my platform, the Jackson Police Department, because I know that how Jackson goes, so goes the rest of Hinds County and the metro Jackson area," Williams said.

The city of Jackson has a little more than 400 officers, far below the 600-man recommendations of the 1999 Linder-Maple study. The city has been unable to retain and expand officers on the force due to uncompetitive pay and benefits, a large number of retirements and plummeting morale. During Melton's two years as mayor, neither he nor Chief Shirlene Anderson has been able to devise budget revisions that would pay officers more, or a working plan to lower the city's surging crime rate.

Lewis, who is director of the training academy in addition to serving as city spokesman, said that recruitment has not been able to keep pace with retirements and the allure of better pay and benefits elsewhere.

"The problem has been getting qualified applicants to pass the entry test … but then there is a series of checkpoints they have go through to qualify," Lewis said. "If we start out with 100 applicants, we may not end up with more than 20. And budget-wise, that's not enough to be effective with a recruitment class, because of all the budget requirements that come with it. The other thing is the competition that we have with law enforcement from surrounding areas ... that have a better (pay and benefits) package than the Jackson Police Department. … We have a lot of guys who want to work with the Jackson Police Department, but the incentive package compared to other agencies is what's hurting us," Lewis said.

Grigsby's position, however, is that the sheriff is neglecting the outlying communities.

"The people out in Utica aren't getting any service for their money. They don't get no patrol, and people will put in calls (to the sheriff's department) out here, and sometimes you see (a patrol vehicle), and sometimes you don't. We just don't see the effort," Grigsby said.

"I'm campaigning now because people are telling me that they're being robbed, and they call the sheriff's department but nobody shows up, or they may show up maybe an hour or two hours later. (Out in Utica) you got your drug problems, you got your robbing and stuff and different things going on, but if you have patrol service—and I was in (the private security) business—you'll slow the crime down. There aren't any ifs, ands or buts about it. People aren't going to do anything illegal if there's a patrol vehicle every time they turn around."

McMillin said he distributes his resources fairly, and he points out that his staff of only 150 patrol officers must cover the entire county. He added that crime fighting in the city is largely the job of the city administration, which appears incapable of tackling the problem.

"My opposition has said on a number of occasions that every time you see a Jackson police squad car, you ought to see a sheriff's vehicle. Now compare the budget that we have to the budget that they have, while keeping in mind that we have the whole county to patrol. We basically step in in Jackson when requested by Jackson. Or we see a situation happening, and we respond. I don't understand how somebody can say that they're going to clean up crime and problems in the county when they haven't done that in the city," McMillin said, alluding to Lewis. "Lewis is a high-ranking police officer with the city. If he wants to make a difference in city crime, then what's keeping him?"

Hinds County Supervisor Doug Anderson said the budget for the county sheriff's department stands at $17.5 million, not including inmate medical fees, which up the cost to $23 million. The budget for the Jackson City Police Department in 2006 was $39.8 million. City accountants projected the police department's budget to be almost $44 million, however, after a recent budget revision for 2007.

Lewis said the police department is doing the most it can with what it has, and he said holding the sheriff responsible for the surge in Jackson crime was a matter of "accountability."

"I think (JPD) is doing everything they can do to solve crime in Jackson. … This is where I started back in 1983, with the same number of men that we have now," Lewis said.

"Since then, crime has changed, the population has changed, and we just don't have the resources to keep up with what's going on. They're doing everything that they can with as little as they have to work with. The key to that is for the taxpayers to get the full benefit of what they're paying for, for the Sheriff's Department to step up to the plate and work with (JPD) to help until they both can get on their feet. … The answer to the question should be: You know where (JPD) is. Where's the Sheriff's Department? They have just as much right to help control crime in Jackson as (JPD). And that's what you will see when I become sheriff."

Crime erupted in the city at the onset of crack cocaine in the early 1990s, with murder counts easily topping 100 by mid-year in some cases. The trend had dropped steadily for five years under the last administration, and by 24 percent under former Police Chief Robert Moore. In 2004, murder dropped to its lowest level in 40 years, joining all seven major crime categories for that year.

The trend in major crime reversed under the new administration, however. A JFP review of 2006 crime statistics showed that crime increased considerably from 2005 to 2006, with monthly Uniform Crime Reports revealing violent crime up 40 percent from the previous year, and property crime up another 10 percent. The same numbers showed not a single JPD arrest for the sale or manufacture of drugs in all of 2006.

Ken Magee, operations commander captain for the sheriff's office, reported about 125 drug arrests in Hinds County during the first quarter of 2007, though he could not say how many of these arrests were made for manufacturing or distributing drugs.

The New Battlefield
Both Lewis and Williams said they want to forge a better relationship between the sheriff's department and Jackson residents.

But McMillin already relies heavily upon neighborhood associations for tips on suspected illicit drug and sex traffic, and he steers patrol vehicles to areas with reportedly high activity. McMillin said that his insufficient county budget forces him to rely more heavily upon eyes in the community and his staff of about 65 unpaid reserve officers.

"Sure, we have big budget constraints, but we're able to do our share with the help of the Hinds County Sheriff's reserves and other support from the community—our numerous neighborhood watch programs," McMillin said. "I suggest you contact Susan Craig, who is my community policing and neighborhood watch/neighborhood association coordinator, and let her give you a list of people in the county. Pick whoever you want out of it, call them and let them speak for the sheriff's department service, its response and the job that they think we're doing."

Battlefield Park resident Robert Kenny said the sheriff's office was really the only law enforcement presence working in the Highway 80 area.

"It was useless calling the police," Kenny said, referring to JPD. "I know some of these guys are having a hard time. I know they're overworked. They're short-staffed. I know there's a lot of good cops, but when I needed to get somebody to bounce some of the obvious drug spots around my neighborhood, McMillin was always there for us, and for a long time, he was pretty much it."

McMillin's concentration on the Battlefield Park community and its George Elementary School helped rid the area of rampant prostitution, and McMillin claims partial credit for helping the elementary school advance to coveted Level 5 status.

"Me and my deputies adopted the school and promised the principal there that we would give them a safe environment for the students, and that's what we've done," McMillin said.

Williams played down McMillin's work in the area, saying the sheriff's focus on that area was a fig leaf for his neglect of the city at large.

"People say that because he makes a few cocaine and hooker arrests on Highway 80 that he's doing something, but he's not working in conjunction with the Jackson Police Department. That goes back to that team of mules I was saying. You need a coordinated effort. He's doing what he's doing for political gain and political gain only. I'm saying that I'm going to be a sheriff for the people overall, not for what's best for my personal politics," Williams said.

Drugs and Interdictions
Williams, a former Mississippi Bureau of Narcotics commander of the Capital City Metro Narcotics Unit between 1990 and 2004, who left the unit to work for the city's code enforcement division, said he wants to use his experience in drug busts to pinpoint areas in the city for drug interdiction and to orchestrate more massive drug busts. He says the sheriff's office is privy to more information on drugs in the area, and he claims that McMillin is hoarding information that could be vital in bringing down drug-trafficking schemes.

"What I've learned about local law enforcement is that everybody wants to keep their information theirs, and because of that, we're not effective at doing narcotics investigations and law enforcement in general. I'm speaking from personal knowledge. This is something that I know to be true," Williams said.

"It's not isolated to the Hinds County Sheriff's Department. The personal drive to get re-elected seems to mean more than moving law enforcement ahead. It's about who's in charge and who' going to get the glory from it. It's territorial. People want to be the person in charge, and a lot of times we suffer because of that."

Williams claims that McMillin hoards such information even though it is gathered with the assistance of federal money through High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area grants.

"I'm speaking directly from my own experience with (the sheriff's department)," Williams said. "How people perform comes from the top down. If (McMillin's) supervisors would not share this information, it was only because it was not allowed to be done from the top. I know investigations were conducted with MBN. It was conducted with federal grant money and done under the supervision of the MBN. These case reports were never submitted to the MBN so that they could make proper use of the information that was gathered."

Williams said he personally requested some of the information in 2004, while working with the MBN narcotics unit.

McMillin said Williams was not being honest.

"I don't want to give any credence to his campaign or his accusations by any reply. Our narcotics unit and our participation in (High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area) program stands on its own," McMillin. "If Williams has any knowledge of any wrongdoing on the part of the sheriff's office that would constitute a violation of the law, then he should go to the district attorney and report that."

Lewis, for his part, said that he wanted to improve interdictions by working more closely with agencies like MBN and the Drug Enforcement Agency.

Do Not Pass Go
The entirety of the county's budget for the sheriff's office is less than $20 million, but most of that goes to maintenance and operation of the county jail and penal farm in Raymond. The jail has had its share of problems. Though a JFP tour of the facility in 2005 revealed a quiet, well-organized holding facility, the building itself is prone to mechanical failures. The roof leaks in numerous places, and the electronic locks on the cells are infamously easy to pick open, when they don't just fail without assistance. The facility also suffers from overcrowding, an issue that keeps many misdemeanor violators, such as prostitutes or small-time drug dealers, out of jail.

All three challengers say they could better run the facility. Lewis said he wanted to reduce the inmate population by focusing on the rehabilitative aspect of incarceration and cutting down on recidivism. He said he wants to bring more clergy and educators into the jail in hopes of better preparing them for their release. He said he would rely on state and other programs to help fund the endeavor.

McMillin has set up a GED course for the jail's younger inmates and is working with some churches to find employment for former inmates, but Lewis claimed he would bring a personal touch to finding inmates jobs.

"My intention is to work with the community—because of all the economic development that's going on in Hinds County, people need laborers, like construction workers, bricklayers, landscapers. I plan to develop a rapport with these businesses that have these types of job opportunities, so they can come in and work and train these individuals for work when they get out of jail."

Lewis also said he wants to work with local rehabilitation programs to help repeat drug violation offenders.

"There's a program called Fatherhood Initiative that is hosted by the Department of Human Services. I spoke with (the founder), and he's excited about coming to the jails and working with the fathers who have children outside of being incarcerated, to let them know that they have responsibilities. I've been through that program, and I'm sold on it. That's something I want to implement to the jails. That would be a must before they are released," Lewis said.

Williams said he did not have enough experience to speak on addressing the issue of overcrowding in the county jail, but said he hoped incoming facilities like the new penal farm and new regional jail would help. Williams said he planned to focus on the jail's maintenance issues, but repeated that he did not have enough information to speak to the problem.

"There are some maintenance and staffing issues down at the jail that have to be addressed immediately, but I'm not in a position to make that statement. I just don't have the needed information," Williams said, adding that he believed supervisors would be open to helping him fix the problem, once he was sheriff.

"There are many other concerns other than the jail or prisoners, but that is a top priority. Crime is at an all time high, and I'm sure the supervisors are aware of what the needs are regarding safety in the county," Williams said.

Grigsby seemed of the same mind as Williams, arguing that supervisors would be open to his suggestions as sheriff.

"If I get in, one of the first things I plan to do is take inventory and see what the condition is of the jail and the penal farm, then I'll sit down with the supervisors and go over it with them, telling them what I need. Once we get it fixed, then we'll maintain safety and get experienced people in there to do the job right. That way, we won't have any mishaps going on," Grigsby said.

"Once supervisors know the situation, once I explain it to them, they'll have to understand."

McMillin frequently rails about the jail, calling it "a pathetic waste of taxpayers' money." He says that despite the enthusiasm his challengers have for getting help from the supervisors, they were instrumental in allowing problems to proliferate at the jail.

"(Construction of the jail) was a mess and a joke, and the Board of Supervisors didn't look after the county when they arranged to have it built," McMillin said. "They didn't have a clerk of the works down there to assure that the job was properly done, that we were getting four inches of concrete—which we paid for—instead of just two."

The jail has suffered two recent incidents where the facility's faulty locks have proved dangerous. In once case, an inmate allegedly picked the lock on his cell and brutally assaulted another prisoner, who was left paralyzed from the neck down.

McMillin has protested to supervisors about the woeful malfunctions out at the jail and complains that Hinds County maintenance is incapable of keeping up with the workload. McMillin says he wants his own locksmith, capable of handling both electronic and mechanical lock issues, who will answer to the sheriff's department rather than the board.

The sheriff added that, while nothing changes, the jail presents a "huge legal liability," and he has assured members of the board that they have just as much to lose as McMillin in the event of legal action.

"I've assured the board that if there's a lawsuit as a result of jail malfunctions that I do not intend to be the only defendant. I have copies of all the times that I have notified them of problems with these locks, that overall the jail is not being maintained properly, so that if we have a lawsuit, I want them to know that they'll be right there beside me in court," he said.

Parking Over Safety
McMillin freely admits that his relationship with the Hinds County Board of Supervisors is strained, even apart from arguments over the county jail.

"It's difficult to make the Board of Supervisors realize that public safety should be their highest priority," McMillin said. "It's my priority, and it's the community's priority. In every poll taken, it's the underlying drive in most anything. Public safety first, before you fund anything else. And it's difficult to operate when that importance, that priority, is not realized by your funding agency. … (Supervisor Doug) Anderson complains that the sheriff's department takes up the lion's share of the county budget, and my response to that is, 'So?' … Anderson thinks, somehow, that a parking garage in the Valley Title Building should take priority over public safety. Meanwhile, (Supervisor) Ronnie Chappell just thinks whatever Doug thinks."

McMillin must take every budget problem—such as recent hikes in fuel costs—to the board, which has generally resisted meeting McMillin's funding requests with tight county revenues.

Once refused, McMillin fires back. He frequently writes the mileage of his aging vehicles—some of which already have logged more than 300,000 miles—upon the back windshields of vehicles. He is also not above orchestrating the occasional "cupcake sale for the sheriff's department" outside the front of the county building on the morning of board meetings.

All three contenders say they can do better with the board. Lewis said convincing the board to hand over the cash was as simple as giving them all the details.

"You have to get along with the people who feed you," Lewis said. "I have a personality and a desire to get along with anybody. I don't see a problem getting along with the Board of Supervisors. I think that when I become sheriff, and the plans I develop as sheriff need funding, they will be provided with a booklet of the needs, how much is needed, and they will be invited to view those needs. They'll be invited to sit at the table to help make those decisions. Of course, you don't get everything you ask for. But to have a good relationship with them, at least you get some of the things you need. … Supervisors need to make sure the money is being used wisely, and being prioritized in the right way, such as salaries, equipment and training. They need to be abreast of those things, and I don't think they've been abreast."

Williams also believes that swaying supervisors is as easy as letting them know the real problem.

"I'm willing to do everything in my power to work with the supervisors," Williams said. "I'm going to let them know what my priorities are and what the needs are of law enforcement. They hold the money, and they're accountable to allocating it, but I will make it known what my needs are to successfully run that department. It's going to be incumbent upon them to provide what is needed."

Grigsby, meanwhile, said he already has a great reputation with board members. "I'm ready to get to know them, but they already know me. I'm the one standing on the picket lines on Highway 18, fighting for the community. Supervisor Doug Anderson and Supervisor George Smith, they know me well. I live in Mr. Smith's district, and we have a pretty good relationship. They know I stand up for rights," Grigsby said.

McMillin shakes his head at their predictions, saying he was tempted to step down from his seat, "just to see the other guys even try" to get along with the board.

The 800-pound Melton Gorilla
A recurring accusation in almost any political interview with McMillin this year is his belief that Melton is backing two of his challengers in an attempt to control the Sheriff's Department. After all, McMillin arrested Melton last summer, and his deputies helped the district attorney investigate the Ridgeway incident.

"It doesn't take a rocket scientist—I think Stevie Wonder could see that," McMillin said of Melton's influence on the race. "Melton put (Lewis) into the position as public information officer of the city, so that every time the mayor is on television, you see Commander Lewis. Another thing: I remember when I was with the city of Jackson, and I ran for sheriff for the first time, the first thing I was required to do was resign. I see that Lewis is still with the city."

Lewis claims that he is only working "on call" with the city. "I have taken vacation until late August, unless I am actually needed," Lewis said.

However, Lewis attended a press event with the mayor as recently as three weeks ago, and numerous city police cars were parked outside Lewis' campaign announcement early this year. McMillin said that Melton is also extending his influence to the Hinds County district attorney's race and is backing Democratic challengers Robert Smith and Michele Purvis.

"I think Melton's intention is to control both the county and the city, to have a sheriff that would let him get away with—let's say, 'To have a sheriff he could control,'" McMillin said.

McMillin said that Melton fears the investigative powers of the sheriff. Though McMillin arrested Melton on the orders of a judge and investigated the Ridgeway incident at the behest of the DA, the sheriff does not need permission to arrest Melton should he break the law.

"I don't need a court order. I have the authority to arrest the mayor for a misdemeanor committed within my presence or a felony that I have knowledge of and a signed affidavit and a warrant for," McMillin said.

McMillin said a man with Melton's problems would have good reason to want to control both the DA's office and the sheriff's office. McMillin said the voters should decide this year if they want an extension of city politics—an administration riddled by lawsuits, budget disasters and a total failure to control crime—into the county.

"You should ask the community if they want to see the sheriff's office operated the way the city police department is operated," McMillin said.

"Crime in the county hasn't changed much over the last 16 years. Crime in the city has exploded. Now ask them if that's what they want for their county. Personally, I think I've done a good job."

Lewis denies that he is a political ally of the mayor, and he pledges to treat the mayor the same as any other citizen. "I'm not a political ally of anyone. I'm a public servant. I'm a person who grew up in this community, and is concerned about seeing my community come back the way it needs to be. ... When I talk to people about that, I tell them that I was here before Frank Melton was here, and I'll probably be here when Frank Melton leaves," he said.

Still, Lewis says he counts the mayor as a friend, and he speaks highly of Melton's passion, which he witnessed when he was a school resource officer and Melton was at WLBT.

"Anything I did with youth, as a school resource officer, they were there to help. That's how we became friends. We had the same goal in mind of wanting to help kids and wanting to give back to the community. … In working with him before he became mayor, I knew where his heart was, as far as working with poverty, working with underprivileged kids and families. I saw that. I saw him bury people out of his own pocket that couldn't bury themselves. That's attractive to me, because that's some of the things I would do, if I were in that position. I knew the passion, and it was unselfish. That's the kind of person—I'm an unselfish person. That's how we clicked."

Williams, too, denies that he is running on behalf of Melton. "At MBN, they asked many people what their career goals were. I made it known at that time that one of my goals was to be sheriff of Hinds County. Upon my accepting employment with the city, I made it clear that I was going to run for sheriff, because I thought the mayor and the sheriff had a very cordial relationship, and I didn't want my goal to be a problem with my employment for the city," Williams said.

Regardless of political allies, McMillin said the county needed stability in the sheriff's office to offset the fast-paced chaos of city government turnovers.

"While I've been here I've seen at least 10 police chiefs come and go, and I've seen mayors come and go," McMillin said. "Personally, I think the county needs a steady hand right now. To quote an old saying from (Franklin) Roosevelt, 'you shouldn't change horses in mid-stream.'"

Read transcripts of the sheriff candidates here:

Malcolm McMillin
Tyrone Lewis
Lester Williams
Henry Grigsby

Previous Comments

ID
81387
Comment

I am a Professional Investigator. I have conducted investigations in every county in this state, several states and the odd foreign job. I have had many interactions with different law enforcement entities including the Hinds County Sheriff's Office. I have always been met with a level of professionalism that I have not seen anywhere else in the State. I wish Sheriff McMillin were also running the City of Jackson.

Author
Slider
Date
2007-07-05T01:10:06-06:00
ID
81388
Comment

There are a lot of people who wish he was running Jackson.

Author
Ironghost
Date
2007-07-05T06:31:18-06:00
ID
81389
Comment

Amazing that JPD wants to blame their crime problem on Hinds Sheriff Office (HSO). JPD can't hire enough officers so it's all HSO's fault that crime in Jackson is rediculous??? Anyone with common sense can see Melton is behind this and wants to control JPD and HSO. Sheriff Mac, you got my vote!

Author
Jo-D
Date
2007-07-05T10:02:34-06:00
ID
81390
Comment

Speaking of, does Mac have a campaign web site or phone number? Everyone I know has a Mac sign in their yard but no one has come to my house and asked!

Author
Jo-D
Date
2007-07-05T10:03:24-06:00
ID
81391
Comment

Awesome article! However, I caught a few errors that you might want to fix: There aren’t any if, ands or buts about it. Change "if" to "ifs". In 2004, the murder dropped to its lowest level in 440 years, joining all seven major crime categories for that year. I don't think this place has been around for 440 years. :-) The key to that is for the taxpayers to get the full benefit of what they’re paying for, for the Sheriff’s Department to step up to the plate and work the with (JPD) to help until they both can get on their feet Did you mean "with the"? McMillin said that his insufficient county budget forces him to rely more heavily upon eyes in the community and his staff of about 65 un-paid reserve officers. No hyphen needed. I spoke with (the founder), and he’s excited about coming to the jails and working with the fathers who have children outside of being incarcerated, to let them know that they have a responsibilities. Leave out "a".

Author
LatashaWillis
Date
2007-07-05T10:54:38-06:00
ID
81392
Comment

Mac has my vote. those opponents just don't have what I see that is needed to be Sheriff. Mac has been real good to any community that asked his help. If I had my druthers I would like to see him Chief of Police.

Author
jada
Date
2007-07-05T12:17:16-06:00
ID
81393
Comment

Donna? Adam? Any answer to my question? Does Mac have a campaign web site or campaign phone number? I would like one or the other. Thanks.

Author
Jo-D
Date
2007-07-06T09:04:14-06:00
ID
81394
Comment

I checked StateDesk.com and there is no link for a Web site for McMillan. Tried Google too. Maybe there isn't one.

Author
LatashaWillis
Date
2007-07-06T09:07:54-06:00
ID
81395
Comment

J, they were just in my neighborhood two weekends ago. If you weren't home, they pass by without leaving a sign. Something tells me MacMillan probably doesn't have a website... He should. Sheriff Mac, if you need a little web help, look me up. You've easily got my vote.

Author
kaust
Date
2007-07-06T09:10:47-06:00
ID
81396
Comment

I guess I'm going to have to just call him at the office.. didn't want to do that really.. ya know, campaign business on county time/phones.

Author
Jo-D
Date
2007-07-06T09:28:09-06:00
ID
81397
Comment

What are the pay-scales for Hinds County deputies? Why is it (seemingly) easier for McMillan to hire than JPD? HDM

Author
HDMatthias, MD
Date
2007-07-06T10:10:38-06:00
ID
81398
Comment

Sorry, Jo-D, I just returned from out of town. I've barely looked at the sheriff stuff posted this week until tonight. And Adam has been busy today breaking stories as you can see. ;-) Matt put up the Q&As today. I'm going through now to proof them, but as these are verbatim transcripts, beware that there may be typos. We apologize in advance.

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2007-07-06T19:04:56-06:00
ID
81399
Comment

I just saw your copy edits, L.W. Thanks so much, and keep 'em coming. I'll go make them now. As everyone knows, the JFP is in an editor transition right now, with this editor deep in some big stories. With Natalie in Chicago and Brian gone and me on the road, Matt and Ronni are carrying a huge load until our new editor starts in two weeks. (Whom y'all are gonna love, I promise.) So, as always, we appreciate all the help y'all provide. Smooch.

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2007-07-06T20:52:19-06:00
ID
81400
Comment

You're welcome, Donna. Let me know if you need help with anything else.

Author
LatashaWillis
Date
2007-07-07T00:18:36-06:00
ID
81401
Comment

How can we find the television spot where Lewis says that we will have to let frank melton break some laws if we want crime to decrease? This was a local news station and probably Channel 16.

Author
justjess
Date
2007-07-09T13:41:22-06:00
ID
81402
Comment

Call the news directors and ask. Start with John Parker at 16.

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2007-07-09T13:46:56-06:00
ID
81403
Comment

Jo-D Need a sign for our good sheriff? I will deliver if ya need one. Just reply. AGamma627

Author
AGamm627
Date
2007-07-11T09:50:12-06:00
ID
81404
Comment

I got one now, but thanks!

Author
Jo-D
Date
2007-07-11T09:59:20-06:00
ID
81405
Comment

Sheriff McMillin has a website as of this evening. It's www.mcmillinforsheriff.com

Author
lucdix
Date
2007-07-11T19:31:17-06:00
ID
81406
Comment

Is that a legit site?? Changes to http://www.lwdgrfx.com/mcmillinforsheriff/ with a gmail address instead of a mcmillinforsheriff.com email address? Kind of late considering the election is a few weeks away, but ok.

Author
Jo-D
Date
2007-07-11T21:09:20-06:00
ID
81407
Comment

Hi, Jo-D, Yes, it's a legitimate site as is the email address. It's redirected to a subdirectory of my site because it was the quickest and simplest way to set it up as opposed to setting up hosting for just a few weeks. I often use gmail addresses so as not to have to worry about mailboxes filling up and bouncing emails sent to them. As far as it being late - yes, it is.

Author
lucdix
Date
2007-07-11T21:24:18-06:00
ID
81408
Comment

Very interesting. The JPD and Hinds County SO blaming each other for Jackson's crime problems. This is another reason Jackson and Hinds County should merge. Most of the county's population is in the Jackson city limits, anyway. There's no reason to fund two separate police agencies. But, I don't live there anymore...so...who cares what I think about the price of milk?

Author
James Hester
Date
2007-07-11T21:55:14-06:00
ID
81409
Comment

lucdix,the keyword spamming is likely to get the site banned by most bots. I'd suggest overhauling your use of keywords and descriptions in the source if you want a bot to take the site seriously. Out of curiousity: - why do you own the copyrights if this is a site for/by McMillin? - why forward the domain to a sub-directory of your personal site rather than use DNS to keep it as an individual domain/directory in the eyes of the enduser and bots? - is this part of the McMillin campaign or a site you created supporting him? It should be made clearer on the site. Also, not to get overly critical, it simply doesn't have the clear design or info that most campaign sites have... And with Melton's friends funneling money into the other campaigns, it's not hard to imagine their sites (though I could be wrong -- look at the city's) having more details and design out of the gate. Image is everything, after all.

Author
kaust
Date
2007-07-12T05:51:33-06:00
ID
81410
Comment

lucdix, I can hook you up with hosting that'll give you unlimited email, a mailing list, (assuming it's for a few months), databases, and a direct directory (among other things). There's no reason McMillin's campaign can't invest in hosting. That's chump change compared to keeping a salaried job one wants and the amount of financial donations his campaign has probably received. Web hosting and designs are something all campaigns should now be factoring into their budgets along with their print materials and tv advertisements. Email me if you want to talk about it... We can setup something monthly with no contract.

Author
kaust
Date
2007-07-12T05:58:40-06:00
ID
81411
Comment

Yeah, it was just weird to see it in its state, and a little too late at that.

Author
Jo-D
Date
2007-07-12T07:22:04-06:00
ID
81412
Comment

mcmillinforsheriff.com no longer redirects. Yes, it's the official campaign site of the McMillin for Sheriff campaign.

Author
lucdix
Date
2007-07-13T13:37:31-06:00

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