House finally passes seatbelt law | Jackson Free Press | Jackson, MS

House finally passes seatbelt law

After years of hard work, the Mississippi House of Representatives finally on Thursday passed a primary seat belt law. The Senate passed their version last week.

Our version is less restrictive than the Senate's, but will qualify us for the $8.7 miilion available under the new Federal SAFETEA-LU Act. There was opposition mounting from members of the Black Caucus that said it would increase racial profiling. I opposed that argument, and in speaking for the bill, I reminded them that we took an oath to uphold the US Constitution which states in its Preamble, "to promote the general Welfare." The genral welfare in this case was to save lives, which of all the fatalities due to non-seat belt usage, African-American males between the ages of 18-25 were the highest number. I reminded them that you cannot fight for your civil rights if you are dead. I also reminded them that if racial profiling is really a concern, then they need to support my bill, which would make it a crime in Mississippi. The author of the seat belt bill, Rep. Bryan Clark, D-Ebenezer, who worked in the state's Crime Lab before becoming an attorney, vividly expressed why it was important for the House to pass this measure. The bill received 92 votes.

Previous Comments

ID
169983
Comment

Now, can we pass the can't-talk-on-cell-phones-while-driving law? It's a war zone out there thanks to folks on cell phones. I won't say I *never* do it; however, I wouldn't if it was illegal.

Author
ladd
Date
2006-01-13T10:38:16-06:00
ID
169984
Comment

I reminded them that you cannot fight for your civil rights if you are dead. Amen to that! Speaking as a sister, our people still need to work on being proactive in their survival. Yeah, things aren't always fair, but you contribute to your own demise when you refuse to wear seat belts, among other things.

Author
L.W.
Date
2006-01-13T22:53:42-06:00
ID
169985
Comment

ladd: I do have a bill that will prohibit cellphone use while driving with a learner's permit.

Author
Rep. Erik Fleming
Date
2006-01-14T01:16:45-06:00
ID
169986
Comment

That's a good start ... with not enough. Some mama talking on a cell phone in a humongous (and inevitably white, for some reason) SUV is going to flatten my Miata any day now ... and I assure you, that chick has got more than a learner's permit. (Shouldn't, but.)

Author
ladd
Date
2006-01-14T10:33:49-06:00
ID
169987
Comment

In a letter to the Ledge today, a man accuses the bad driving habits on young people. ROTFLMAO. I very seldom see an "adult" of any age stop at a stop sign in this city -- and many of those adults have little kids in the car with them observing their behavior. But, let's miss the chance for as bit of youth-bashing, eh? It is not difficult to notice that the ages of the people responsible for the actions are 18-25 years old. Also, that same age group seems to believe that the speed limits only apply to others and that they are above the law. Most every day, I just wonder if their parents put forth any effort to teach them the rules of the road or if they have any inkling of what the words "courtesy" and "consideration" mean.

Author
ladd
Date
2006-01-14T10:42:00-06:00
ID
169988
Comment

My teenage stepsons drive pretty good, so I don't want to infer that I am in the same ideology that all teens are bad drivers. But it is a precautionary tool ( my bill) to learn good habits while working towards that license. I think someone else has address your concerns in a bill. I can't introduce them all! LOL

Author
Rep. Erik Fleming
Date
2006-01-14T17:11:53-06:00

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