Yarber Signals Shakeup with Crisler Pick | Jackson Free Press | Jackson, MS

Yarber Signals Shakeup with Crisler Pick

Crisler is a veteran of Jackson-area government and politics. In recent years, Crisler has run for Jackson mayor, transportation commissioner and state senate.

Crisler is a veteran of Jackson-area government and politics. In recent years, Crisler has run for Jackson mayor, transportation commissioner and state senate. Photo by Trip Burns.

The appointment of former Ward 6 Councilman Marshand Crisler as public-safety commissioner marks the start of Mayor Tony Yarber's vow to overhaul the city's organizational chart.

This week, Yarber indicated he would create two commissioner positions—one for public safety and another for quality of life—under the direction of the city's chief administrative officer.

Speaking at the monthly gathering of Jackson 2000, a civic organization that promotes racial understanding, Yarber stressed that these commissioners would not have supervisory authority over employees, but would instead oversee the flow of information between city departments and the mayor's office.

"I don't want my police chief involved in grant writing," Yarber told the gathering. "I don't want my police chief involved in anything but fighting crime."

Of Crisler, Yarber said at a press conference on Thursday that "his job will be to organize (and) coordinate the efforts between, not only law enforcement, but our local public safety efforts," which includes the fire department and other emergency services.

A message left on Crisler's cell phone this morning was not immediately returned.

Crisler's name has often been in the news in recent weeks.

Shortly after Yarber was sworn in as mayor in late April, rumors circulated that Crisler would join the administration as either chief-of-staff or CAO; those appointments went to Jackie Anderson-Woods and Gus McCoy, respectively. On Wednesday, May 14, Crisler's son, Rashaad, announced his candidacy for Ward 6 councilman, the position his father and Yarber formerly held.

Crisler is a veteran of Jackson-area government and politics. In recent years, Crisler has run for Jackson mayor, transportation commissioner and state senate. A retired major with the U.S. Marine Corps, Crisler also worked for the Hinds County Sheriff's Department for 17 years and served as police chief in Utica.

Yarber also ended speculation that he might replace Jackson police Chief Lindsey Horton, whom late mayor Chokwe Lumumba appointed last summer.

"We want to put to rest any rumor about there being any change that will happen at this time with our police chief," Yarber said. "We want to let you know that Lindsey Horton is the chief of police of the Jackson Police Department. It is the position of this mayor that this police chief will be able to carry out the new initiatives that will lead and take crime fighting to a new level in this area."

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Comments

RonniM 5 years, 1 month ago

"Yarber stressed that these commissioners would not have supervisory authority over employees, but would instead oversee the flow of information between city departments and the mayor's office."

So Yarber is putting a layer of bureaucracy between himself and his direct reports. Is it just me, or does this sound like a really bad idea?

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multiculturegirl37 5 years, 1 month ago

It's not just you. For someone who stressed the need to save city money I don't see how adding new positions does that. Also why do we need a new position to write grants? There are these people called grant writers that the city could just contract with or I'm pretty sure they already have people on staff capable to do the job. It just seems like a really weak excuse to appoint someone to a meaningless position.

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sarahmina 5 years, 1 month ago

Yarber OWES people. This is paying back and is indicative of who the man told you he was before he was elected. You GET what you pay for. Too bad, Jackson was on its way to building a government that truly empowered the people of the city. With Yarber you empowered ward 1 and a "select few" in the city. Pay attention Jackson.

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