School Cuts Gay Student Photo from Yearbook

photo

The ACLU has taken up the fight of lesbian Wesson Attendance Center student Ceara Sturgis, pictured here with her mother, Veronica Rodriguez, who wants her photo in the yearbook.

Correction appended April 29, 2010; see below.
Also see: Ceara's Season, Adam Lynch's interview with Ceara Sturgis' family

When Veronica Rodriguez opened Wesson Attendance Center's Yearbook on Friday, she didn't see her lesbian daughter Ceara Sturgis pictured or named in the senior-portrait section of the yearbook. The latest blow came after a long battle with school officials to include a photo of her daughter wearing a tuxedo in the school's 2010 yearbook. She called the Jackson Free Press Sunday with her disappointing news.

"They didn't even put her name in it," Sturgis' mother Veronica Rodriguez said of the yearbook's senior section. "I was so furious when she told me about it. Ceara started crying and I told her to suck it up. Is that not pathetic for them to do that? Yet again, they have crapped on her and made her feel alienated."

Sturgis' baby picture did appear in pages following the portrait pages with her name beside it, Rodriguez told the Jackson Free Press. She was also pictured several times in other sections of the yearbook, in soccer-team photographs, National Honor Society and other sections. "If she wasn't in those groups, she wouldn't be there," her mother said. A photograph her mother took of her in her tuxedo appears on a page purchased by her family. "I don't think there was anything they could do about that; I purchased that," Rodriguez said of the bought senior page.

Sturgis and her mother commissioned the Mississippi ACLU to protest officials' October 2009 decision not to allow Sturgis' photo to appear in the senior yearbook because she chose to wear a tuxedo instead of a dress. The ACLU wrote an October letter demanding officials use Sturgis' submitted photo in the yearbook, but Copiah County School District officials refused. Still, Rodriguez said she expected her daughter to at least be named on the senior page, perhaps with a "photo unavailable" box. What she discovered on Friday, when the yearbook came in, was that the school had refused to acknowledge her entirely on the senior pages.

"It's like she's nobody there, even though she's gone to school there for 12 years. ... They've got kids in the book that have been busted for drugs. There's even a picture of one of the seniors who dropped out of school," Rodriguez said.

"I don't get it. Ceara is a top student. Why would they do this to her?"

Copiah County School District spokeswoman Martha Traxler refused to comment on the school's reason for excluding Sturgis from the senior page, and referred all questions to Copiah County attorney Olen Bryant Jr. Bryant did not immediately return calls.

Last year, the school gave no indication that it would withhold Sturgis' information, but said it had legal justification to not run Sturgis' photo.

"We have had our legal counsel research the validity of the position of the School District on this matter," Copiah County Superintendent Ricky Clopton said in the statement. "We are informed by counsel that this exact issue has been litigated in federal court. The decisions of the federal courts completely support the policy of the district in this regard. It is the desire of the Copiah County School District to inform, first, the patrons of the district, and second, all other interested parties, that its position is not arbitrary, capricious or unlawful, but is based upon sound educational policy and legal precedent."

ACLU legal director Kristy L. Bennett said the district referred to a 2004 settlement of Youngblood v. School Board of Hillsborough County, Fla. In that case, former Robinson High School principal Kevin McCarthy refused to alter the school's senior photo dress code that required female students to wear a scoop-necked drape, which ruled out the possibility of student Nicole Youngblood posing in a suit.



Youngblood sued the Hillsborough County School Board that year, claiming the rule was discriminatory. The resulting settlement allowed seniors 14 days to appeal the dress code prior to photos.

 ACLU attorneys maintain that the Youngblood case made no official reference to the student's sexuality, however. Shannon Minter, an attorney who represented Youngblood in the 2004 case, said Copiah had chosen a poor foundation upon which to build an argument, considering the school settled with the plaintiff.

"The school agreed to settle the case and changed their policy. That's the only reason we dropped our appeal," Minter said. "These policies are blatantly unlawful. Any court of appeals in this country would likely find such policy to be unlawful now."

The ACLU would not confirm if it planned any legal action on the school's decision at this time.

Rodriguez said she expected the district to attempt to downplay her daughter's presence, but not to leave her out of the senior section altogether. She said officials' position runs counter to the more accepting opinions of Sturgis' classmates.

"She basically grew up here, but she feels so isolated. And it's not the students. The students love and accept her," Rodriguez said. "The kids even nominated her for prom queen, but she ducked out, knowing the officials would never let her be prom queen."

CORRECTION, April 29, 2010: Thanks to a watchful reader, the Jackson Free Press discovered today that reporter Adam Lynch originally misinterpreted Veronica Rodriguez's phone call about her daughter's yearbook. The above story originally reported that the yearbook contained no mention or photos of Sturgis or her accolades, but we confirmed from her mother today that she is pictured in sections other than the senior-portrait section. We have edited the above story to reflect this fact, and added the above bolded paragraph based on our conversation with Sturgis' mother today. We have requested a copy of the yearbook, and will update this story further if needed once we receive it. We apologize for the errors and thank the reader who pointed out the mischaracterization. -- Editor Donna Ladd

Previous Comments

ID
157429
Comment

Stuff like this just really pisses me off, especially since, if true, they put kids who've dropped out and kids who've been busted selling drugs in the yearbook but won't put one of the smartest kids in the school, in the yearbook - just because she wanted to wear a tuxedo in her picture.

Author
LambdaRisen
Date
2010-04-26T14:04:39-06:00
ID
157439
Comment

Well make sure you keep calling! When people do things like this, they are never available for comment. They won't even give a "No comment!" That makes me even madder in a way than what they did. They run and hide when exposed for abiding by their moral code. They could at least come and say "We believe homosexuality is immoral and we don't want to condone it by publishing one its apostles in our school-sanctioned publication," which everyone knows is what they are thinking. They just run and hide! Cowards!! You're supposed to stand up for Jesus, not run in shame! You're hypocrites as well as cowards!

Author
DrumminD21311
Date
2010-04-26T16:22:34-06:00
ID
157441
Comment

The purpose of the yearbook is to commemorate your school experience, and is especially important for High School Seniors. Speaking as a former yearbook editor, this is a deliberate injustice! Not only is this disrespectful to Ceara, but also to her classmates, and all other GLBT students, faculty, and staff in that school! Trust me, she is NOT alone! The editors, the sponsors, and everyone in higher authority at that school should be ashamed of their behavior. Instead of celebrating and respecting diversity, they initialize someone’s entire existence and replace it with a clear picture of their own ignorance.

Author
dv2010
Date
2010-04-27T08:05:40-06:00
ID
157458
Comment

The bigotry displayed by these so-called adults towards this courageous young woman is unconscionable. My lesbian daughter was fully supported in her request to be photographed in a tux; she felt a drape gown and pearls was a misrepresentation. She never misrepresented herself before---why should she be forced to then? She also attended her prom with her tux-wearing girlfriend--without incident. As a result, she had a happy end to her high school career, which she deserved, as do all children. We live in a suburban community north of San Francisco, so obviously that made a difference...but it shouldn't.

Author
sparkysteph50
Date
2010-04-28T01:02:49-06:00
ID
157459
Comment

i recall for graduation and senior pictures there were quite a few rules to follow. the teachers that sponsored graduation expected you to follow those rules. it stands to reason if a student at this school wore a ratty t-shirt for their picture it would have been excluded also. individuality isn't a real focus in secondary education. plus "teen in twilight tee excluded from yearbook" doesn't get much press.

Author
sinkingship
Date
2010-04-28T06:48:02-06:00
ID
157461
Comment

It's shameful that a school should endeavour to hurt any student in this way. Disappearing a student? You've got to be kidding. (Fortunately, they've been pretty ineffectual, thanks to the internet...) Ceara, you are awesome for standing up. It will be easier for other kids because of you.

Author
Ajay
Date
2010-04-28T08:11:20-06:00
ID
157464
Comment

Paul, as the founder and editor of the Jackson Free Press, I can tell you that many Mississippians are NOT settling for being backward or regressive in any way. You wouldn't believe the progressive movement going on in this state right now -- which includes many progressive people of faith who are supportive of gay rights. Of course, the national media do not tend to report those things about us, so the story doesn't get out. They blow it up when we do stupid things (like in the recent gay teenager scandals), which is fine, but they seldom balance it by noticing our progress and the very real work on the ground here on racial reconciliation and other human-rights, social-justice issues. But that's OK. We will keep up the good fight, and this newspaper will keep bringing whatever needs to be brought to light, regardless of what any political party or special interest group thinks about it, and without regard to what a woefully un-diverse national media thinks about it. That is not to be defensive; it is to tell you that you do not know the whole story about this state because no one is telling you.

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2010-04-28T10:25:26-06:00
ID
157466
Comment

This is crazy, folks. It is also interesting that some of these same folks who aided in the decision to keep the young kid out of her yearbook are the same ones who will ignore the abuse of children. Why don't they help with the movement against the Pope who has hidden so much of the Church's sexual abusive history against young males and females? This would seem like a better cause. Just thinking.

Author
justjess
Date
2010-04-28T12:28:21-06:00
ID
157473
Comment

@sinkingship--The issue here is freedom of gender expression, not whether one has a clean or torn shirt. The first is about discrimination---the latter merely petty.Girls are not required to wear dresses to school; even in schools where uniforms are required girls wear pants. So why is a girl required to wear a dress for a senior photo? Many girls (including my own daughter)are not comfortable in dresses, and never wear one, so to be forced to do something to fit what is basically a social construct (really, what difference does it make or why is it anyone's business if a girl want's to dress in more masculine attire, or a boy in more feminine?), and that misrepresents who they are is inane. And while individuality may not be a focus in secondary education...perhaps it should be more so then there would be wider acceptance of diversity, and more children learning to think for themselves, as this young woman does. It takes an incredible amount of courage to go against the norm---a norm that is in place to demean, diminish and promote bigotry, prejudice, and intolerance.

Author
sparkysteph50
Date
2010-04-28T13:35:42-06:00
ID
157474
Comment

What ever happened to UNI-SEX clothing? Remember when women wore "male" neckties and "male" tuxedos to include the satin strip up the side. I wonder if any of the women, responsible for this decision, wear pants or must they have on their peticoats, their long dress/skirt, and ruffled panties to make sure that no one mistakes them for a male when posing for a picture? Folks, this is wierd, mean and just plain STUPID!

Author
justjess
Date
2010-04-28T13:35:43-06:00
ID
157477
Comment

I just called the Copiah School District to tell them that I am disgusted that they would treat a child in this manner. I ask that you do the same: 601-894-1341 Thanks

Author
cc423
Date
2010-04-28T13:50:10-06:00
ID
157479
Comment

cc423, I just followed your lead and called the # you gave. Some female answered, listened for a few seconds and then slammed the phone down. We need someone to try to interview those jokers.

Author
justjess
Date
2010-04-28T14:05:45-06:00
ID
157481
Comment

@sparkysteph50- and sometimes a dress is just a dress. so applaud her for making her statement; part of the freedom of expression or speech is the consequences you may face as a result. for the picture she was required to wear a certain outfit. that's the issue. you can't distort the facts to "suit" your argument. i, like most people, attended high school and there was a dress code for senior pics appearing in the yearbook and for the graduation ceremony. if she wants to exercise her rights in defiance of that then fine. something as trivial as a yearbook should be immaterial. where's yours? i'm sure it's prominently displayed in your home. everybody should cut the hyperbole and ad hominem attacks against Mississippi and the school system.

Author
sinkingship
Date
2010-04-28T14:24:59-06:00
ID
157483
Comment

Thanks Justjess. Even if they are hanging up on people, they are getting the message.

Author
cc423
Date
2010-04-28T14:36:17-06:00
ID
157484
Comment

That's not the point sinkingship. They erased her entire experience and existence. It was not JUST the photo. What sort of message is this school and school district sending to our gay kids? Just look at Nathan Kolton's comment. THAT is the message those kids are getting from the adults who are there to educate them, not judge them. Mississippi is better than this.

Author
cc423
Date
2010-04-28T14:42:07-06:00
ID
157486
Comment

Along the same lines...I was just forwarded this link...check this story out.... http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/2010/04/28/2010-04-28_hate_group_westboro_baptist_church_to_picket_lesbian_teen_constance_mcmillens_gr.html

Author
amoderatemississippian
Date
2010-04-28T14:56:22-06:00
ID
157488
Comment

I also just called the school directly at 601-643-2221 and spoke to a woman on the phone. She kindly listened to my assertion that it was disrespectful to erase her from the yearbook. When I asked her if she understood the pain that would cause her and her family, she just said "no comment" and hung up.

Author
gtown705
Date
2010-04-28T15:13:04-06:00
ID
157489
Comment

sinkingship: I do applaud her. But the fact that freedom of speech and expression may have certain consequences doesn't negate the fact that the school took discriminatory action against her, singled her out, and negated her high school existence based on an arbitrary, outdated "rule" that has no place in our current society. Not only that girls must wear dresses, but that they must not wear tuxes, or appear masculine or gender variant, or be gay...all of which this young woman is. This is called DISCRIMINATION, not distorting facts to suit an argument. A dress is only a dress if it's something you WANT to wear. Just because the "rules" exist, and existed when you or I graduated (for me, that was '72, and we were allowed to wear our regular clothes) doesn't make them right. I'd like to add, having 3 kids who are all young adults now---I've PAID for each and every one of those year books, and they are not cheap. So why shouldn't I, or my child, have a say in how they are represented? No one has the right to determine what is important to another. And you and I can agree to disagree. But discrimination is discrimination.

Author
sparkysteph50
Date
2010-04-28T15:27:34-06:00
ID
157490
Comment

LOL! That's awesome that y'all are actually calling the school! Change happens through action, not bitching online. I'm too much a coward to do that. I would recommend asking to speak to an administrator first before making your case the next time you call. The 60 year old secretary that makes $20,000 a year and spends her free time planting roses probably isn't the best person to sound off to.

Author
DrumminD21311
Date
2010-04-28T15:58:12-06:00
ID
157491
Comment

That's true DrumminD21311, but if those administrators are not going to talk to the press, they certainly are not going to talk to me. But somehow, I think the nice lady will tell them about the calls.

Author
cc423
Date
2010-04-28T16:01:56-06:00
ID
157495
Comment

You don't have to tell the secretary why you are calling. Make up a story. I think that it's ok to lie in this situation, at least in my Bible. Pretend you are a member of the PTA wanting to schedule some events, then when the principal gets on the phone, let her have it!

Author
DrumminD21311
Date
2010-04-28T16:33:43-06:00
ID
157500
Comment

Okay...you guys have apparently not picked up one of these year books. I have, and Ceara is infact in the year book! The only thing that seems to be missing is her "Senior picture". However, her baby pictures are in there, the who's who has her picture, her band picture, soccer team photo, prom photos and a "senior page" of her was allowed. Note also, that she is in fact shown in a tux in both the "senior page" and prom photos. She is most definitely included in the yearbook. Maybe it was wrong to exclude her senior picture from the spread...but there's no real evidence of discrimination. If the officials had allowed a straight female to wear a tux, but not Ceara...it would shine bigger than anything. But there was no straight females in tuxes. It just seems like southern fried tradition has claimed another poor soul in the bible belt. AND! Ceara quite possibly could have had a choice to just do a face shot (which I was allowed to do for my year book), showing her in neither a tux or a dress...and still gotten her photo in the senior spread. Wasn't her choice for a tux based on just being comfortable with what she was wearing for the photo? (that's what some of her interviews say when this story first came up.) A face shot can be done with just a t-shirt, which is more comfortable than a tux in my opinion. Back to my point...either the article or the source for the article has made it seem like the year book has absolutely no trace of Ceara what-so-ever...when it does. I don't know if this is a writers oversight, or a source's lie; but it should be noted somewhere that she's in the yearbook, being acknowledged as a student at that high school (and a senior), but JUST her senior picture is missing. And its not like the family didn't already know about her senior picture not being published in the year book. Were they not informed, back in October of 09, about the school's positions and the actions they were taking? Why is this article and the protests just now coming up. The year book is out, and there isn't a chance of changing what's happened. Protests, from what I know of, happen when a change CAN be made.

Author
zomgabunny
Date
2010-04-28T22:15:45-06:00
ID
157506
Comment

The principal of Wesson Attendance Center is Ron Greer, he is friends with the Superintendant, Ricky Clopton. Some interesting things about Copiah County School District: Wesson Attendance Center continues to meet the state standards for skills on the MCT tests. Another school in Copiah County School District, Crystal Springs Middle School has been a failing school for three years. They have lost 4 teachers since August because of the poor support and working conditions. Yet the school district has chosen to support the Wesson Attendance Center. Where is the support and help for the school and teachers in Crystal Springs? What are we telling our students when we exclude someone? We show them that bigotry and ignorance are okay. We show them that being different is wrong. We show them that adults are the powerful ones and they have the control. Where would the world be without people who are different? It is ridiculous that the school and county officials have been so narrow minded and cruel. The white school gets the attention while the black school is failing.

Author
emeady
Date
2010-04-29T07:13:16-06:00
ID
157507
Comment

Wow...Mississippi...just not cool. It's sh** like this that ruins learning environments for everyone. So what if she's a lesbian, it's not like being such a little b**** about it will change anything. It'll just enrages people who are often discriminated against. Ceara, if you are reading this, trust me, there are a lot of people on your side. So what if your school is an ass, I'm sure you have made more friends than you could have ever know just by taking a stand on this (even though they are anonymous). Your existence is definitely acknowledged, not only by your school but the whole world. Honestly, if I was in your school, I would've burn my year book as soon as I get it; a school year book that doesn't include everyone is just a piece of shiit that no one really give a rat's ass about.

Author
orange
Date
2010-04-29T07:34:26-06:00
ID
157525
Comment

Thanks to you, zombabunny, we have talked to Ceara's mother and corrected the story. As I say above in the correction, it is clear that the source (her mother) gave us the correct information, but Adam mistakenly misinterpreted it in the above story. It is now corrected.

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2010-04-29T14:49:16-06:00
ID
157535
Comment

@Joshua Bozeman -- you want us all to "get real", but that's just not possible when you deny the fact that discrimination exists against young gay people like Ceara. Here's what's real: homophobia and anti-gay hostility.

Author
Oscar59
Date
2010-04-29T19:05:37-06:00
ID
157537
Comment

Bozeman, you would be bringing up some good points if it weren't for the fact that wearing the drape and tux are not rules. There is no mention of it in the student code of conduct, nor is it a requirement for getting a picture taken. She did not break any rules by wearing the tux, she broke with tradition. There is no reason to punish her for breaking with tradition, and an archaic one at that. Really, the school district had more important matters to pay attention to, and the bible quoting religious principal at Wesson Attendance Center decided not to allow her to break tradition. The Superintendent is his buddy, so the district picked this fight to fight. Meanwhile the other schools in the district are not doing well, and are continuing to lose teachers. It's ridiculous that they treated a student like this, and it's even more ridiculous that they haven't been handling their other business.

Author
emeady
Date
2010-04-29T19:51:48-06:00
ID
157539
Comment

First: Just so everyone knows, my mom would never tell Ceara to "suck it up" if she was crying. There apparently was a misunderstanding with the interview. My mom is loving and supportive of Ceara and I and was always a comfort to us when we cried. I just wanted to clarify that small portion! Second: THANK YOU SOOOOOOO MUCH for everyone's support! You have no idea how much it means to not only Ceara, but her family as well. So thank you, thank you, thank you!!!

Author
Ashleyafuller
Date
2010-04-29T21:23:06-06:00
ID
157540
Comment

Joshua, I completely agree with your comment. If the school had allowed a straight woman in a tux or not have included Ceara's picture in a dress (turned in on time) this situation would be VERY different. But, I'm willing to bet, that even a straight man who wanted to be in a white, double breasted tux, with a windsor knot (instead of a bow tie) would not have been allowed in that senior spread. Rules are definitely rules. Just because she happens to be gay, and not following the rules, doesn't mean that the school is discriminating when they deny her request. And it can be clearly seen in the "backwards pageant" (mentioned in previous interviews) and Ceara's tux photo's that did make the year book, that the school is not against "cross-dressing". They just do not allow it for the FORMAL senior portrait spread, and that rule has been the same for longer than most of us have been alive. Of course it is my assumption that the school has been around that long...but it CAN be seen in other schools that have.

Author
zomgabunny
Date
2010-04-29T21:53:08-06:00
ID
157549
Comment

I read about this story today in The Advocate; it's national news now that Ceara's senior picture was deleted from the high school yearbook. I am taking the time to write to the Jackson Free Press from my home in Colorado. What a petty, cruel thing for the school to do. They are supposed to provide a role model and adult guidance for the students, and what they have demonstrated instead is that childish hatred, bigotry and intolerance are alive and well in the district. Ceara's courage and example to the American people will long outlive the prom and the yearbook since the nation has clearly awakened to the need to expand protections to gay people nationwide. Best wishes to Ceara, her family, and her supporters, especially those in Mississippi.

Author
torqueflite
Date
2010-04-30T12:12:49-06:00
ID
157559
Comment

All, I have copies of the relevant pages from Ceara's yearbook here. It is sobering to look at the "Seniors 2010" pages (five of them total) and see no reference to her whatsoever. It is clear why she and her family were so upset. I'm not going to post those pages because iother young people are pictured and named on the pages. On the up side, the page her mother bought with a collage of photos and messages from her and "Mawwaw & Pawpaw" are very fun and touching. I'll see about getting that one PDF'd and posted shortly. (None of the young people are named.)

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2010-04-30T14:12:02-06:00
ID
157560
Comment

Also, I know I've said it already, but Ceara has a remarkable, loving family.

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2010-04-30T14:12:48-06:00
ID
158130
Comment

Again? After the Constance situation, Mississippi is challenging this again? When will they grow up? I suppose I'll see in a couple of years. I've planned to wear a tuxedo at least to my senior prom, if not in my photos, for a while. Dresses make me feel awkward and fake. It's just not me. Anyone that knows me knows I'll go out in mid-summer wearing jeans and a jacket. All I can really say is, Mississippi really needs a wake-up call. It's absolutely ridiculous what high schools have come to. I've had my fair share of butting heads with my school. I'm bisexual and participate actively in Day of Silence, something that is rarely heard of in Mississippi. I colour my hair blue, almost never seen in this podunk state. I'm an extremely friendly person and am friends with most of my peers, have had fantastic grades since kindergarten, participate actively in many school activities, so why is it that schools across Mississippi are singling out individuals like this? We've done nothing wrong. So we're girls that like girls. So what? Why should they care? And why oh why is a tux on the female body so WRONG? For most that choose, they feel better, more real, in the tux than a scoop-necked dress. Just because we're female doesn't mean we're feminine. Ceara, I applaud you for standing up for what you are and for refusing to let a petty school full of bigotry change you. These are turbulent times for people such as you and I, but if this is what it takes, teens being subjugated for who they are, to change society to be more accepting, so be it. Because in the end, it doesn't matter what some school officials think. You have your individuality and you were rigid to their discriminatory warfare techniques, thus you kept your personality and sent a message saying that you won't be changed by bigots in society. I'm proud of you and hope to follow strong in your footsteps. It may take years, but soon enough, people like you and I will make this society accepting for generations to come. Keep on kicking, and never back down. Just be yourself and the rest will follow. Fight for what you believe in! ^^; Sorry for the length, I tend to get very passionate about things like this...

Author
Meagan Brown
Date
2010-06-10T07:55:53-06:00
ID
158208
Comment

I have responded to the blog from Grant MacDonald twice and each time, the message is not recorded. Testing!

Author
justjess
Date
2010-06-15T10:45:54-06:00
ID
158213
Comment

Grant MacDonald, I hope that I am able to get this one through. I had a very close relative who was the son of a catholic priest. He died in his early thirties and secondary to a bad drug trip: cocaine laced with embalming fluid. The priest was moved to another part of the world and I'm sure his history would repeat itself: Another place, another time and another person (young girls and boys). Over my many years in this life, I have had interactions and some real meaniful friendships with gays, lesbians, christains, non-christains, protestants, atheist, agnostics and ect.: These were good folks with good heart and many did great things. Knowing the religious and political climate we live in, it is no doubt that you run into problems trying to get to your bottom line. The world can be unrelenting to one who gives a challenge to santa, the easter bunny, and the cross - All in the same beath. What I got out of your message was a yearning for the protection and safety of those who are unable to defend/protect themselves: Fairness and equality for all members of our society and without limits based on race, creed, color or sexual perference. This is the type of world that many of us yearn for. As Donna Ladd remains so positive about Jackson and the positive direction it is headed: I challenge you to be of greater faith in what we can accomplish as we fight together to protect and establish rights for others. Didn't get a chance to check spelling or grammar: Hope you can read it!

Author
justjess
Date
2010-06-15T14:42:08-06:00
ID
158280
Comment

Completely unacceptable! Very sad how this was even allowed in the "land of the free", especially in a highschool! I hope she feels 'free' to sue and wins.. not only is it defaming (because the school has acknowledged their dislike of her as a person, by excluding her name and image from her year book, as if she was not a part of the student body, based solely on the fact that she, being a female, wore a tux (made for a male essentially)for her yearbook picture, but this is malicious and a damaging misrepresentation of her... "Libel" inverted! This is totally exclusionary, homophobic and pretty much a hate crime as this is Libel http://bobby-collins.blogspot.com/

Author
streykatt
Date
2010-06-21T22:39:46-06:00
ID
158291
Comment

http://peacebisquit.fanbridge.com/campaigns/show.php?id=635215&src=facebook

Author
streykatt
Date
2010-06-23T09:24:41-06:00
ID
159386
Comment

It is a simple fact: SOME OF US NEVER LEARN FROM HISTORY. When the school system is broke secondary to payoffs to the victims of our mis-treatment, perhaps the lesson will be learned.

Author
justjess
Date
2010-08-18T09:25:47-06:00
ID
159388
Comment

Shawn, she wasn't trying to wear something that wasn't allowed under the dress code, like a bikini or a t-shirt. She was trying to wear something that many seniors wear. The dress-code argument doesn't fly.

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2010-08-18T09:42:29-06:00

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