Sens. Hyde-Smith and Wicker Vote to Continue Shutdown | Jackson Free Press | Jackson, MS

Sens. Hyde-Smith and Wicker Vote to Continue Shutdown

Mississippi Sens. Cindy Hyde-Smith (pictured) and Roger Wicker were among the senators who voted against reopening the government.

Mississippi Sens. Cindy Hyde-Smith (pictured) and Roger Wicker were among the senators who voted against reopening the government. Photo by Ashton Pittman

WASHINGTON (AP) — A splintered Senate swatted down competing Democratic and Republican plans for ending the 34-day partial government shutdown on Thursday, leaving President Donald Trump and Congress with no obvious formula for halting the longest-ever closure of federal agencies and the mounting damage it is inflicting around the country.

Mississippi Sens. Cindy Hyde-Smith and Roger Wicker were among the senators who voted against reopening the government.

The twin setbacks triggered a swirl of bipartisan activity, unseen for weeks, aimed at resolving the vitriolic stalemate, if only temporarily. A day before 800,000 federal workers faced a second payday with no paychecks, senators seemed to have had enough of the standoff and had decided it was time to seek a way out.

A parade of senators from both parties took to the Senate floor to advocate reopening agencies for three weeks while bargainers seek a solution. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., dashed to the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., to explore potential next steps.

"We're talking," Schumer told reporters, one of the most encouraging statements either side has made since the shutdown began Dec. 22.

At the White House, Trump told reporters he'd support a "reasonable" compromise but suggested he'd want it to include a "pro-rated down payment for the wall," which he did not describe. He said he has "other alternatives" for getting wall funding, an apparent reference to his disputed claim that he could declare a national emergency and fund its construction using other programs in the federal budget.

It was initially unclear whether the flurry of activity would produce results. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., whose relationship with Trump seems to have soured by the day, told reporters a "big" down payment would not be "a reasonable agreement." Asked if she knew how much money Trump meant, Pelosi said, "I don't know if he knows what he's talking about."

In an embarrassment to Trump that could weaken his position whenever negotiations get serious, the Democratic proposal got two more votes than the GOP plan. There were six Republican defectors, including freshman Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, who's clashed periodically with the president.

For most of Thursday, both parties in conflicting ways to showed their sympathy for unpaid federal workers while yielding no ground in their fight over Trump's demand to build a border wall with Mexico.

The Senate first rejected a Republican plan reopening government through September and giving Trump the $5.7 billion he's demanded for building segments of that wall, a project that he'd long promised Mexico would finance. The 50-47 vote for the measure fell 10 shy of the 60 votes needed to succeed.

Minutes later, senators voted 52-44 for a Democratic alternative that sought to open padlocked agencies through Feb. 8 with no wall money. That was eight votes short. It was aimed at giving bargainers time to seek an accord while getting paychecks to government workers who are either working wihout pay or being forced to stay home.

Flustered lawmakers said Thursday's votes could be a reality check that would prod the start of talks. Throughout, the two sides have issued mutually exclusive demands that have blocked negotiations from even starting: Trump has refused to reopen government until Congress gives him the wall money, and congressional Democrats have rejected bargaining until he reopens government.

Thursday's votes could "teach us that the leaders are going to have to get together and figure out how to resolve this," said Sen. John Thune of South Dakota, the No. 2 Senate GOP leader. He added, "One way or another we've got to get out of this. This is no win for anybody."

For now, partisan potshots flowed freely.

Pelosi accused Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross of a "let them eat cake kind of attitude" after he said on television that he didn't understand why unpaid civil servants were resorting to homeless shelters for food. Even as Pelosi offered to meet the president "anytime," Trump stood firm, tweeting, "Without a Wall it all doesn't work.... We will not Cave!" and no meetings were scheduled.

As the Senate debated the two dueling proposals, McConnell said the Democratic plan would let that party's lawmakers "make political points and nothing else" because Trump wouldn't sign it. He called Pelosi's stance "unreasonable" and said, "Senate Democrats are not obligated to go down with her ship."

Schumer criticized the GOP plan for endorsing Trump's proposal to keep the government closed until he got what he wants.

"A vote for the president's plan is an endorsement of government by extortion," Schumer said. "If we let him do it today, he'll do it tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow.'

The White House closely monitored the Senate votes and Trump spoke with lawmakers throughout the day. He was waiting to see if many Democrats crossed over to back his plan, but West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin proved to be the only one.

In one indication the lawmakers were ready to act, Vice President Mike Pence attended a pre-vote lunch with GOP senators and heard eagerness for the standoff to end, participants said. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., said their message to Pence was "Find a way forward."

In consultation with their Senate counterparts, House Democrats were preparing a new border security package they planned to roll out Friday. Despite their pledge to not negotiate until agencies reopened, their forthcoming proposal was widely seen as a counteroffer to Trump. Pelosi expressed "some optimism that things could break loose pretty soon" in a closed-door meeting with other Democrats Wednesday evening, said Rep. John Yarmuth, D-Ky.

The Democratic package was expected to include $5.7 billion, the same amount Trump wants for his wall, but use it instead for fencing, technology, personnel and other measures. In a plan the rejected Senate GOP plan mirrored, Trump on Saturday proposed to reopen government if he got his wall money. He also proposed to revamp immigration laws, including new restrictions on Central American minors seeking asylum in the U.S. and temporary protections for immigrants who entered the country illegally as children.

In another sign of hope, Thursday's vote on the Democratic plan represented movement by McConnell. For weeks, he'd refused to allow a Senate vote on anything Trump wouldn't sign and has let Trump and Democrats try reaching an accord. McConnell has a history of helping resolve past partisan standoffs, and his agreement to allow Thursday's vote was seen by some as a sign he would become more forcefully engaged.

At a panel discussion held by House Democrats on the effects of the shutdown, union leaders and former Homeland Security officials said they worried about the long-term effects. "I fear we are rolling the dice," said Tim Manning, a former Federal Emergency Management Agency official. "We will be lucky to get everybody back on the job without a crisis to respond to."

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