Steve Rozman | Jackson Free Press | Jackson, MS

Steve Rozman

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Steve Rozman, 66, is leading the charge for civic engagement and social responsibility at Tougaloo College, around the state and across the nation.

"To improve anything nationally or locally, you have to improve people's awareness, so they'll be more knowledgeable of their objective interests," says Rozman, who has been married to his wife Jeanne for 26 years says.

Tougaloo was the perfect place for Rozman, who has taught at the school for 35 years. He hails from Minnesota, where he earned a degree in political science at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. He went on to earn his master's degree in Latin American studies at the University of Florida in Gainesville, before he earned his doctorate in political science.

Three years ago, Tougaloo President Beverly Hogan created The Center for Civic Engagement and Social Responsibility, and Rozman became director. Under the center's direction, all students at Tougaloo are required to fulfill 60 hours of community service before graduating.

"The center is designed to strengthen Tougaloo's commitment to the community," he says. "It's an important resource that we use to engage our students and faculty in the world around them."

The center also conducts community-based participatory research, teaming with community service organizations and schools through a grant from the Bonner Foundation. This research allows the center to address public policy issues from the perspective of those most affected, voices often shut out of public debate.

The center has strong bonds with the Higher Education Center at the University of Southern Mississippi, and now the center is developing the same kind of relationship with Mississippi State. Nationally, the center works with schools such as Brown University.

"We're trying to connect the historically African American institutions and their activities with the majority institutions," Rozman says. "We want to bring together a diverse group to deal with common interests."

The center also shows films and holds forums on campus. Last October, they hosted a debate between Rep. Bennie Thompson and challenger Chuck Espy, and an upcoming forum will deal with global warming.

"In this environment—Jackson and Tougaloo—if you want to do something, there are opportunities," Rozman says.

For more information on the Community Based Participatory Research Summer Institute, June 26-29, contact Rozman at [e-mail missing] or call 601-977-4460.

Previous Comments

ID
82581
Comment

“To improve anything nationally or locally, you have to improve people’s awareness, so they’ll be more knowledgeable of their objective interests,” says Rozman, who has been married to his wife Jeanne for 26 years says. Oops, I think you have an extra "says" in there. ;-) Anyway, I never took a class under him, but I remember hearing his name a lot among my political science and pre-law buddies in school.

Author
LatashaWillis
Date
2007-06-07T11:00:31-06:00
ID
82582
Comment

I guess I should admit that I know professor Rozman. I majored in psychology and decided at the last minute to go into law therefore cramming in political science classes under him and attorney Constance Slaughter Harvey. He didn't particilarly care for me because I was always a big talker and dreamer. He always told me he wasn't convinced that I could do all or any of the things I talked about. Ultimately, he wounded up not liking me very much and I couldn't stand him. On the other hand, Connie liked my zeal and ambitious outlook and encouraged me to pursue all those big dreams. Rozman would be amazed at how I turned out, and Connie is happy as expected. One of the highlights of my career has been handling a case involving her where we both got to interrogate witnesses. I could see and feel the pride she felt as she watched me also. Rozman no doubt is a good man and teacher. Looking back he probably wasn't that crazy about me switching careers at the last minute and seeking his blessing and recommendation to do so. I'm still mad too. He, he, he.

Author
Ray Carter
Date
2007-06-12T15:56:34-06:00
ID
82583
Comment

Ray, I'm pretty sure you drove him nuts. Hey, I've done my share of working my instructors' nerves, too - I asked too many @#$% questions. :-P

Author
LatashaWillis
Date
2007-06-12T18:47:19-06:00
ID
82584
Comment

I've had occasions to interact with Dr. Rozman over the years. I'm sure that he was a great faculty member at one point in time, but that was probably when I was still in elementary school in the early '80s. If anyone is where they should be professionally, it's Dr. Rozman. Where else but Tougaloo College, the Eagle Queen, could one comfortably do absolutely nothing but leech salary & grant funds from an institution of "higher" learning for well over a decade without truly producing anything of substance to enhance the institution, the students, the community, or academia in general? There are more of the same at the school besides Dr. Rozman, so I don't intend to single him out; there are, unfortunately, too many others who need to never enter another classroom for the rest of their lives, unless it's to collect grandkids after school or to attend PTA meetings. I know too may people, who had a decent educational foundation prior to attending Tougaloo, who can attest this thought. Any professionals out there with the same thoughts??

Author
cityofjacksonms
Date
2007-06-14T20:51:32-06:00
ID
82585
Comment

[Last comment about Dr. Rozman, I promise.] And...this article is posted on the "Jacksonian" page - Dr. Rozman is a resident of the City of Madison (as confirmed on the Madison County Tax Assessor's site). ;-)

Author
cityofjacksonms
Date
2007-06-14T21:01:16-06:00
ID
82586
Comment

If anyone is where they should be professionally, it's Dr. Rozman. Where else but Tougaloo College, the Eagle Queen, could one comfortably do absolutely nothing but leech salary & grant funds from an institution of "higher" learning for well over a decade without truly producing anything of substance to enhance the institution, the students, the community, or academia in general? Would you care to elaborate further, cityofjacksonms, since you wish to bash my alma mater?

Author
LatashaWillis
Date
2007-06-14T21:08:08-06:00
ID
82587
Comment

And...this article is posted on the "Jacksonian" page - Dr. Rozman is a resident of the City of Madison (as confirmed on the Madison County Tax Assessor's site). I am sure that the ones who own this paper are at liberty to make an exception when they want to, especially if they feel that the person being highlighted is making a contribution to Jackson in some way.

Author
LatashaWillis
Date
2007-06-14T21:10:55-06:00
ID
82588
Comment

It's mine too.

Author
cityofjacksonms
Date
2007-06-14T21:11:32-06:00
ID
82589
Comment

Point well taken about the paper's ownership and discretion. I do understand that.

Author
cityofjacksonms
Date
2007-06-14T21:12:54-06:00
ID
82590
Comment

It's mine too. That concerns me even more. What's the deal?

Author
LatashaWillis
Date
2007-06-14T21:17:06-06:00
ID
82591
Comment

There's no deal, just that there are many who enjoyed their educational and personal experiences at the institution, and many others who did not. I'm in the middle - I enjoyed my personal experiences (didn't pledge), and could/should have better spent those tuition dollars for MY education (not speaking about anyone else) at an institution that seriously challenged intellect across the board. I realize that an education is what you make of it - I truly do. But speak to the bulk of Kincheloe majors (who completed their BS degrees within the past 15 years and went to medical/dental school) and they'll tell you they weren't prepared for the next step. Tougaloo's admission requirements (taken from the online 2005-07 catalog): "Each student who files a college application is considered for admissions. Following this initial application, the applicant must: 1. Submit evidence of high school completion. 2. Submit scores from ACT/SAT. 3. Submit evidence of 2.00 high school cumulative grade point average. 4. Submit evidence of the completion of the required units. 5. Submit $25.00 application fee." -- Note that there is no requirement for a minimum ACT/SAT score, as there is at State-supported institutions. I thought that juco's and vo-techs were supposed to fill the voids for those who couldn't otherwise attend college due to educational deficiencies (and not due to the historical denial of access to education because of the color of one's skin).... Tougaloo is where history is supposed to be meeting the future. That motto can never become a reality until the PRESENT is acknowledged and addressed. The leadership & faculty . . . tsk, tsk, tsk. ...and the struggle continues.

Author
cityofjacksonms
Date
2007-06-14T21:39:33-06:00
ID
82592
Comment

Sorry you feel that way, city. I enjoyed my experience for the most part. I was in Upward Bound in high school, got in on a presidential scholarship, joined some clubs, got inducted into the honor society, pledged, etc. I guess I just made do with what I had. :-) I'm not expecting everyone who went to Tougaloo to paint a rosy picture about everything. Tougaloo has imperfections like any other school. I just wanted to see where you were coming from. No love lost. :-D

Author
LatashaWillis
Date
2007-06-14T22:02:54-06:00
ID
82593
Comment

The center also shows films and holds forums on campus. Last October, they hosted a debate between Rep. Bennie Thompson and challenger Chuck Espy, and an upcoming forum will deal with global warming. So, this is doing nothing? No offense, city of jackson, but I thought your post seemed harsh on Rozman, maybe even envious. One thing a lot of people don't know about event production (like a debate, seminar, workshop, etc.) is that it takes more preparation than you would think. Many details must be attended to, that, if done well, you'll never even notice when the event goes off smoothly. You only notice when something is screwed up.

Author
Izzy
Date
2007-06-15T06:51:32-06:00
ID
82594
Comment

Also, directing every student at Tougaloo in and out of a major volunteer commitment doesn't sound like "nothing" to me, either. It sounds to me like you have some inferiority issues & you're taking it out on Mr. Rozman.

Author
Izzy
Date
2007-06-15T06:53:05-06:00
ID
82595
Comment

Izzy, my class ('96) was the first required to complete 60 hours of community service for graduation. I completed mine at a preschool. Guess who was our advisor? Melton's CAO, Robert Walker.

Author
LatashaWillis
Date
2007-06-15T07:21:51-06:00
ID
82596
Comment

Tougaloo does a wonderful job considering its financial limitations. There is some truth in what City is saying. The good outweights the bad by a long shot though. Rozman is one of the few teacher whose value I've always questioned. He was/is arrogant and often wrong about the potential of students. I would have kept John Garner and many others and run off him instead. He's not comparable to Ernest Borinski or Gordon Hill, legends who truly loved and dedicated themselves to the students, and making changes in Mississippi. Rozman believes too much in the status quo for my taste. I suspected he would never change - grow up.

Author
Ray Carter
Date
2007-06-15T07:42:11-06:00
ID
82597
Comment

well, you three know him better than I do, having gone to Tougaloo. It's easier to hear criticism when it isn't quite so intense.

Author
Izzy
Date
2007-06-15T08:07:56-06:00
ID
82598
Comment

Folks, there is no smoke here. We've featured people who live outside the city limits as "Jacksonians" in the past. We don't define it quite that narrowly.

Author
DonnaLadd
Date
2007-06-15T08:22:03-06:00
ID
82599
Comment

I stand by my comments though that I think Rozman is a good person. Borinski and Gordon are hard acts to follow. Gordon's last name likely not Hill. I forgot it. Borinski was a nationally rocognized sociologist and lawyer driven by being persecuted as a German Jew. He had to flee to avoid being killed. When he spoke and lectured we saw a giant who had made giant steps. Gordon without this background also hated racism and prejudicial ways, and was dedicated to changing it. Rozman is a different breed than them. I'm sure Rozman was a good teacher, but he wasn"t these guys who the students adored.

Author
Ray Carter
Date
2007-06-15T08:24:34-06:00
ID
82600
Comment

Steve Rozman is one of colleagues at Tougaloo. These slanderous comments are absurd. I challenge any of you to come to the college and explore his record. Compare it with what you have accomplished. Dozens of testimonials about his mentorship are available to anyone who is interested. He is hard on students who do not live up to their potential, that is true.

Author
Willezurmacht
Date
2007-06-15T09:17:09-06:00
ID
82601
Comment

I haven't slandered him at all. I had him as a teacher and know many ex-students who had him also who have a worst opinion of him than I do. It wouldn't surprise me that some students liked him and consider him a mentor to them. He wasn't any mentor to me but I was around him only in 2 or 3 classes and made good grades under him. He was arrogant and impatient without dispute, and he certainly wasn't anything like the other two teachers I named, who I preferred. Had I been a political science major I may have been around him more and grew to like and consider him a mentor. He's no mentor to me. Initially I resisted commenting on Rozman since I didn't have much good to say. We can debate whether he had achieved so much more than any of us. Where is the proof? I bet I can round up as many ex-student who share my view as you can who share yours.

Author
Ray Carter
Date
2007-06-15T09:37:21-06:00
ID
82602
Comment

36 years of teaching is a remarkable achievement. How does he compare to Richard McGinnis who is also a legend at Tougaloo?

Author
Ray Carter
Date
2007-06-15T09:40:41-06:00
ID
82603
Comment

In the interest of being fair, Willie; I'll admit that I don't understand Rozman and never has. Tell me who he is and what he stands for.

Author
Ray Carter
Date
2007-06-15T09:46:32-06:00
ID
82604
Comment

Also Willie, in case Professor Rozman reads this, tell him to overlook my errors in spelling or grammar. It's the computer's fault, and I'm in a hurry, as always. Likely one of the problems he had with me.

Author
Ray Carter
Date
2007-06-15T10:55:17-06:00
ID
82605
Comment

Cityofjacksons, I think you just loss your argument when you said, "But speak to the bulk of Kincheloe majors (who completed their BS degrees within the past 15 years and went to medical/dental school) and they will tell you that they were not prepared for the next step." If the person was able to pass the MCAT and go through the rigors of interviewing at even the worse Medical School in the country, you had better believe that the person was ready. Learning is a dangerous thing and it takes on many forms from one person to another. A teacher I thought was "great" was hated by some who thought that she was the pitts. What is the next step after medical school and residency -AJOB! At Harvard, there are professors in their 80s and 90s who teach a class every now and then. These people are held in very high esteem and have received professor emeritus status from their college or university. This presentation of complaint seems narrow in scope and making a case about his homehouse/residence in Madison just takes the cake. Tougaloo has a sister relationship with Brown University. Tougaloo's history is rich in the biographies of wealthy whites from other places in the world. There are exchange students on the campus from places much farther away than Madison. Sometimes we are forced to do a little self-inventory to be clear on our own issues. Most very smart people do not think that they are very smart and can often live with the fear of failure. My son attended Tougaloo and it wasn't the teachers, it was the night life and the partying. It took him a minute; however, he is now very successful. Again I ask, "WHAT IS THE NEXT STEP.' Sounds like the 'LOO did its part.

Author
justjess
Date
2007-06-15T12:34:47-06:00
ID
82606
Comment

Thanks Justjess. I'm going to win the powerball lottery and give 75% to Tougaloo so that the school will fianllay not be poor any more.

Author
Ray Carter
Date
2007-06-15T12:44:23-06:00
ID
82607
Comment

OK Ray Carter. I use to have the mind of an elephant and could remember everybody and everything. Now in my old age, I have the memory of a flea and must make notes and write things down. So, I am writing......Ray Carter will give 75% of his powerball winnings to Tougaloo. Don't come looking like a cabbage (all head and no cash) when you win. I know a whole lot of folks on the books at Tougaloo who have promised millions and haven't paid dip. (LOL)

Author
justjess
Date
2007-06-15T12:51:52-06:00
ID
82608
Comment

Yes, I know some folks too who have promised millions and did little or nothing. I won't be one of them though.

Author
Ray Carter
Date
2007-06-15T12:57:01-06:00
ID
82609
Comment

Tougaloo has a sister relationship with Brown University. Tougaloo's history is rich in the biographies of wealthy whites from other places in the world. There are exchange students on the campus from places much farther away than Madison. Through their exchange program, I met my first white Rastafarian at the 'Loo. Wonder what she's up to now. :-) Yes, I know some folks too who have promised millions and did little or nothing. I won't be one of them though. Ray, I never promised millions, but I did promise to give back something after I became successful in life. I'm still waiting for the success to kick in since I'm still earning my degree in the School of Hard Knocks.

Author
LatashaWillis
Date
2007-06-15T14:20:43-06:00
ID
82610
Comment

I've given money many times before and intend to give several thousands next year at my 30th year anniversary.

Author
Ray Carter
Date
2007-06-15T14:29:15-06:00
ID
82611
Comment

justjess & Izzy, Please trust me as I state that I do know more about what I write than you think I do. At this particular time, I cannot reveal how I know what I know so that people may remain protected. (The anonymity of the JFP blogs is wonderful, and I'd like to keep it that way.) (Specifically to Izzy,) I have a terminal degree and a house with too much space in it. I have traveled the world for both business & pleasure. I have organized & conducted workshops, and planned international conferences. I have held faculty status and taught on college campuses. My friend, inferiority - except to God & my blood elders - has no place in my life. I was only stating what I know, but I admit that I failed to balance my argument when I omitted some of the good things coming from the school. Perhaps I lashed out on the relatively good name of Stephen L. Rozman, Ph.D., but his just happened to be the one at hand for the discussion. I will credit Dr. Rozman for helping to keep the HBCU Faculty Development Network, http://www.hbcufdn.org/ (with which many of you are probably not familiar) based at Tougaloo College. Now, THAT is a major, positive accomplishment. It's actually quite sad that the Network doesn't get nearly as much press as it should. Also, the undergraduate research initiatives of the College are great. It is my understanding that Tougaloo College led the charge, not too many years ago, for liberal arts undergrad institutions to incorporate true research into its programs. The College hosted multi-day symposia in which students from HBCUs in Mississippi, Tennessee, & Louisiana participated. That's a GREAT thing.

Author
cityofjacksonms
Date
2007-06-16T12:51:55-06:00
ID
82612
Comment

But there are several others in the Natural Sciences, Education & Humanities Divisions who ought to take permanent breaks from the school. Their names need not be mentioned; if they happen to read this blog, they'll know they are. On the other hand, that's enough about my alma mater and what's wrong with it (besides not having a 9-digit endowment). Let's change up and discuss some good stuff going on there and how the school can get better. I'm a firm believer that as soon as the City of Jackson finally gets around to improving County Line Road west of State Street, then all kinds of economic development will not only be possible, but will, in fact, happen. I see TIF projects, ad valorem tax exemptions, and tax credit housing developments.... (uh oh...that might not be the bright side of the project after all.) Let me try again - I see new commercial developments, mostly office complexes, but possibly some mixed developments as well. I'm sure that, if the area is well-secured, Tougaloo College could develop some of its land into upper-end townhomes and condos; it would not have to sell the properties, but only lease them to the public (or to able-pocketed alumni??) THEN we might be able to get some truly meaningful community engagement going on – the kind that gets revenues INTO the College’s bank accounts instead of that which merely rates good press from time to time. ~Donna – I’m trying to be a good boy, I promise. :-)

Author
cityofjacksonms
Date
2007-06-16T12:52:23-06:00

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